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Diabetes Patients Benefit From Amlodipine Titration

Last Updated: April 26, 2011.

An amlodipine/olmesartan medoxomil-based titration regimen is well tolerated and may reduce blood pressure in patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

TUESDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- An amlodipine/olmesartan medoxomil (OM)-based titration regimen is well tolerated and may reduce blood pressure (BP) in patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

C. Venkata Ram, M.D., from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, and colleagues assessed safety and efficacy of an amlodipine/OM-based titration regimen in 207 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Patients were given 5 mg amlodipine and were uptitrated in a stepwise manner at three-week intervals to amlodipine/OM 5/20, 5/40, and 10/40 mg and then amlodipine/OM 10/40 mg plus hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 and 25 mg, if the seated BP remained stable at ≥120/70 mm Hg. The primary end point measured was change in 24-hour ambulatory BP from baseline.

The investigators found a significant change in ambulatory BP at 12 weeks; the change from baseline in the mean ± standard error of the mean ambulatory systolic/diastolic BP was −19.9±0.8/−11.2±0.5 mm Hg. At the end of 18 weeks of active treatment in patients uptitrated to amlodipine/OM 10/40 mg plus hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg, the change was −28.0±1.5/−13.7±1.0 mm Hg. A guideline-recommended seated BP goal of less than 130/80 mm Hg was attained by 62 percent of patients. Drug-related adverse effects, such as peripheral edema, dizziness, and hypotension, were seen in 19.3 percent of patients.

"Amlodipine/OM-based titration regimen was well tolerated and effectively lowered BP throughout the 24-hour dosing interval in patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes," the authors write.

Several of the study authors disclosed financial ties with the pharmaceutical industry, including Daiichi Sankyo Inc., which supported the study.

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