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Low Statin Adherence After Coronary Revascularization

Last Updated: May 26, 2011.

Patients hospitalized for coronary artery disease have significantly lower statin adherence following coronary revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass graft surgery) than after medical therapy, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients hospitalized for coronary artery disease (CAD) have significantly lower statin adherence following coronary revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI] and coronary artery bypass graft surgery [CABG]) than after medical therapy, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Alexander Kulik, M.D., M.P.H., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues assessed the adherence to statin therapy in 13,130 patients hospitalized with CAD between 1995 and 2004, and treated with either coronary revascularization or medical therapy. Participants aged 65 years or older were prescribed statin therapy within 90 days of discharge. Statin adherence was evaluated based on the proportion of days covered with statin therapy after discharge, and cover of 80 percent or more days was considered as full statin adherence. Adherence to statins was compared in 3,714 patients treated with medical therapy, in 6,309 with PCI, and in 3,107 patients with CABG.

The investigators found that statin adherence increased significantly from 70.5 to 75.4 percent during the study period. Full adherence rates were seen in 70.6 percent of patients who underwent PCI and in 70.2 percent of patients treated with CABG, which were significantly lower than the adherence rate for patients treated with medical therapy (79.4 percent). Increased statin adherence was significantly and independently associated with factors including medical therapy, previous statin use, use of other cardiac medications after CAD, later year of hospital admission, and white race.

"In patients receiving invasive coronary treatment, statin adherence remains suboptimal, despite strong evidence supporting their use," the authors write.

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