Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Family Medicine | Gynecology | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Mortality Higher in Early-Term Infants Than Full-Term Infants

Last Updated: May 26, 2011.

Early-term infants are at a higher mortality risk than those born at full term, and there are racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality rates for early-term and full-term births, according to a study published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Early-term infants are at a higher mortality risk than those born at full term, and there are racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality rates for early-term and full-term births, according to a study published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Uma M. Reddy, M.D., M.P.H., of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues analyzed data on 46,329,018 singleton live births between 1995 and 2006 to estimate the trend of maternal racial and ethnic differences in mortality for early-term versus full-term births. Early term was defined as 37 0/7 to 38 6/7 weeks' gestation, and full term was defined as 39 0/7 to 41 6/7 weeks' gestation.

The researchers found that infant mortality rates for both early-term and full-term births decreased during the time period; infant mortality at 37 weeks' gestation dropped 35.4 percent for Hispanics, 22.4 percent for whites, and 6.8 percent for blacks. Neonatal mortality rates were higher in all groups at 37 and 38 weeks compared with 40 weeks. At 37 versus 40 weeks, the relative risk of neonatal mortality was 2.6 for Hispanics and whites and 2.9 for blacks. In blacks, for both early- and full-term gestations, neonatal mortality and post-neonatal mortality were 40 and 80 percent higher, respectively, than they were for whites; Hispanics, however, had a lower post-neonatal mortality rate than whites.

"Early-term births are associated with higher neonatal, post-neonatal, and infant mortality rates compared with full-term births, with concerning racial and ethnic disparity in rates and trends," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Chiropractic Spine Manipulation Unlikely to Cause Injury Next: Lateral Violence Affects Health Care Work Environment

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: