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Clopidogrel Doesn’t Reduce PCI-Related Complications

Last Updated: June 10, 2011.

Clopidogrel pretreatment for patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), with bivalirudin as the planned anticoagulant, is not associated with a reduced risk of PCI-related complications, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Clopidogrel pretreatment for patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), with bivalirudin as the planned anticoagulant, is not associated with a reduced risk of PCI-related complications, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Amit P. Amin, M.D., from Saint Luke's Mid-America Heart and Vascular Institute in Kansas City, Mo., and colleagues examined the association between clopidogrel pretreatment and PCI-related complications among 1,913 patients undergoing elective PCI who received bivalirudin as the antithrombotic regimen. Of these patients, 923 (48 percent) received clopidogrel. The primary end point was the composite of in-hospital death or myocardial infarction.

The investigators found that the incidence of in-hospital death or myocardial infarction was similar for the group receiving clopidogrel pretreatment (5.5 percent) and the group that did not (5.8 percent). There were also no significant differences between the two groups in terms of in-hospital bleeding events (1.0 percent for both) or one-year ischemic complications (7.5 versus 8.3 percent).

"The primary result of our study was that among patients undergoing elective PCI with bivalirudin as the anticoagulation regimen, there was no difference in the rate of periprocedural ischemic complications between patients who did and did not receive preprocedure clopidogrel loading," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

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