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Evidence Lacking That Aspirin Use in IVF Improves Birth Rate

Last Updated: August 11, 2011.

Aspirin use for women undergoing in vitro fertilization cannot be recommended due to lack of evidence indicating effectiveness in improving outcomes, according to a review published online Aug. 10 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin use for women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) cannot be recommended due to lack of evidence indicating effectiveness in improving outcomes, according to a review published online Aug. 10 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

Charalambos S. Siristatidis, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Athens in Greece, and colleagues reviewed available literature to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of aspirin for improving the outcome of IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment cycles. A total of 13 randomized controlled trials on aspirin for women undergoing IVF, covering a total of 2,653 participants, were identified for inclusion. The primary outcome was the live birth rate per woman or couple.

The investigators found no significant differences between the treatment and control groups for any of the outcomes assessed. The meta-analysis assessing the effect of aspirin on live birth rate found no significant differences when compared with controls (relative risk [RR], 0.91; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 1.15; three studies and 1,053 participants). There were also no significant differences for clinical pregnancy rate (RR, 1.03; 95 percent CI, 0.91 to 1.17; 10 studies and 2,142 participants), and ectopic and miscarriage rate (RR, 1.86; 95 percent CI, 0.75 to 4.63; three studies involving 1,135 participants and RR, 1.10; 95 percent CI, 0.68 to 1.77; five studies involving 1,497 participants).

"Use of aspirin for women undergoing in vitro fertilization cannot be recommended due to lack of evidence from the current trial data," the authors write.

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