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Pegloticase Tied to Lower Uric Acid Levels in Chronic Gout

Last Updated: August 16, 2011.

Pegloticase lowers uric acid levels in patients with refractory chronic gout, according to a study published in the Aug. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

TUESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Pegloticase lowers uric acid levels in patients with refractory chronic gout, according to a study published in the Aug. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

John S. Sundy, M.D., Ph.D., from the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., and colleagues investigated the efficacy and tolerability of pegloticase in 225 patients with severe gout intolerant or refractory to allopurinol, and a serum uric acid of 8.0 mg/dL or greater. Patients in two trials, C0405 (109 subjects) and C0406 (116), received intravenous infusions of either 8 mg pegloticase (12 biweekly treatments), pegloticase alternating with placebo (monthly treatments), or a placebo. The primary end point was uric acid levels of less than 6.0 mg/dL at three and six months.

The investigators found that, in trial C0405, the primary end point was reached in 47 percent of the biweekly group, 20 percent of the monthly group, and 0 percent of the placebo group. In trial C0406, the primary end point was reached in 38 percent of the biweekly group, 49 percent of the monthly group, and 0 percent of the placebo group. In both trials, the end point was reached by significantly more patients in the pegloticase groups versus placebo. When the data were pooled, 42 percent of the patients in the biweekly groups, 35 percent in the monthly groups, and 0 percent of the placebo groups attained the primary end point. Four deaths occurred in patients receiving pegloticase and three occurred in patients receiving the placebo.

"The use of pegloticase 8 mg either every two weeks or every four weeks for six months resulted in lower uric acid levels compared with placebo," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry, including Savient Pharmaceuticals, which funded the study.

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