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Category: Allergy | Monthly Briefing

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September 2011 Briefing - Allergy

Last Updated: October 03, 2011.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Doctors, Patients Identify Tacit Clues in Their Interactions

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Both doctors and patients identify tacit clues as well as judgments based on these clues during video elicitation interviews of health maintenance examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Maternal, Cord Blood Folate Not Tied to Childhood Eczema

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal and cord blood serum folate levels are not significantly different between infants with and without eczema, but infants exposed to high doses of supplemental folic acid per day in the third trimester have an increased risk of eczema, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Allergy.

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U.S. Docs Feel They Give More Patient Care Than Required

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many primary care physicians in the United States believe that their patients are receiving too much medical care, and that the pressure to do more than is necessary could be reduced by malpractice reform, adjusting financial incentives, and spending more time with patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Asthma Prevalence Elevated in Youth With Diabetes

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma is more prevalent in youth with diabetes compared to the general U.S. population, and is associated with poor glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes, especially if untreated, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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GLCCI1 SNP Lowers Response to Inhaled Steroids in Asthma

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at rs37973 correlates with decreased glucocorticoid-induced transcript 1 gene (GLCCI1) expression, which is associated with a reduced response to inhaled glucocorticoids in patients with asthma, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with late-breaking presentations at the European Respiratory Society Congress, held from Sept. 24 to 28 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

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Mortality Up in Hospitals With More Minority Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of in-hospital mortality for trauma patients are associated with the proportion of minority patients in the hospital, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery.

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F1+2, VEGF, D-Dimer Levels Up in Nonallergic Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with nonallergic asthma exhibit autoreactivity as well as increased levels of coagulation and angiogenesis markers, according to a study published in the October issue of Allergy.

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Work Intensity Similar Across Physician Specialties

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The level of physician work intensity appears to be similar among specialties, with variations in the specific dimensions of stress, physical demands, performance, and temporal demand, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Medical Care.

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No Benefit of Long-Term Azithromycin for Rhinosinusitis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with persistent chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), low-dose, long-term treatment with azithromycin (AZM) for 11 weeks offers no significant benefit, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Allergy.

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Many Mistakenly Believe FDA OKs Only Safe, Effective Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of the U.S. public mistakenly believes that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves only effective and safe drugs, but providing consumer explanations can lead to better drug choices, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Climate Change Model Predicts Increase in Childhood Asthma

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Global-to-regional climate and atmospheric chemistry models predict an increase of 7.3 percent in emergency department presentations for regional summer ozone-related asthma in children aged 0 to 17 years across the New York City metropolitan region by the 2020s, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Persistent Asthma Diagnosis Tied to Late-Preterm Birth

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Late preterm birth is correlated with an increased diagnosis of persistent asthma, use of inhaled corticosteroids, and more acute respiratory visits, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Comparative Efficacy Proposed for European Drug Approval

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- New drugs should be compared with existing treatments instead of placebo before their approval in Europe, according to a report published online Sept. 6 in the BMJ.

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Many Hospital Staff Uniforms Contaminated With Bacteria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- More than 60 percent of hospital staff uniforms are contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria, including drug-resistant species, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Odds of Board Certification Vary in New Doctors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certification of recent U.S. medical school graduates by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) varies across specialties by educational and demographic factors, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Medical Students Show Racial, Cultural Patient Preference

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students may have a preferential bias toward whites and wealthier patients, but this does not appear to influence their clinical decision making or physician-patient interactions, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Increased Food Allergen Sensitization in Black Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Black children and those of African ancestry are more prone to food sensitization to multiple food products, with children of African ancestry more likely to develop sensitization to peanuts, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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FDA: Antipsychotic Drug May Cause Severe Allergic Reaction

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The drug label for Saphris (asenapine maleate), an antipsychotic medication, has been revised to warn of the risk of serious allergic reaction in patients with hypersensitivity to the drug, according to a safety alert issued Sept. 1 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Researchers Ponder 9/11 Health Impact a Decade Later

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- It may be too early to tell how much of an impact the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster and its immediate aftermath had on those exposed, but cancer, death, mental and physical disorders, and spirometric abnormalities appear higher in people who received greater levels of exposure, according to three studies published in the 9/11-themed Sept. 3 issue of The Lancet.

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