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ACG: Colonoscopic Adenoma Detection Rate, Mozart Linked

Last Updated: November 01, 2011.

Adenoma detection rates on colonoscopy improve when an endoscopist blinded to study outcome listens to Mozart, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, held from Oct. 28 to Nov. 2 in Washington, D.C.

TUESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Adenoma detection rates on colonoscopy improve when an endoscopist blinded to study outcome listens to Mozart, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, held from Oct. 28 to Nov. 2 in Washington, D.C.

Catherine O'Shea, D.O., and David Wolf, M.D., from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, investigated whether adenoma detection rates were impacted by the endoscopist listening to Mozart while performing a colonoscopy. A total of 161 colonoscopies that were performed over a one year period, along with their corresponding pathology reports, were used to determine the baseline adenoma detection rates for two endoscopists (with an experience level of a minimum of 1,000 colonoscopies). These two endoscopists then performed 118 screening colonoscopies, while being randomly assigned to listening to Mozart or no music, between October 2010 and April 2011. Endoscopist 1, but not 2, was blinded to outcomes and data collected. Adenoma detection rates during the study were compared with the baseline rates.

The investigators found that both of the endoscopists (with and without music) had consistent cecum and withdrawal times. Baseline adenoma detection rates for endoscopists 1 and 2 were 21.25 and 27.16 percent, respectively, and increased from baseline with and without music for both endoscopists. The adenoma detection rates for endoscopist 1 were 66.7 and 30.4 percent with and without music, respectively. The corresponding rates for endoscopist 2 were 36.7 and 40.5 percent, respectively.

"The endoscopist blinded to the study outcome had a higher adenoma detection rate while listening to Mozart as compared to without Mozart," the authors write.

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