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Study Evaluates Clinical Implications of Genital Piercing

Last Updated: November 11, 2011.

With the increasing popularity of all forms of body modification, genital piercing (GP) has become more common and, as such, the clinical and diagnostic implications need addressing, according to the results of an updated synopsis of GP literature published in the November issue of Urology.

FRIDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- With the increasing popularity of all forms of body modification, genital piercing (GP) has become more common and, as such, the clinical and diagnostic implications need addressing, according to the results of an updated synopsis of GP literature published in the November issue of Urology.

Thomas Nelius, M.D., of the School of Medicine in Lubbock, Texas, and colleagues evaluated 35 years' of data on GP to provide information to assist men and women with such piercings in decision-making when they present to urologists.

The researchers found few studies regarding the clinical implications of GP. From peer-reviewed literature, only 17 cases in 17 years described specific complications, and most of these articles were from international sources. The authors did conclude, however, that they were able to gather more evidence about men and women with GP and that their review should stimulate further research.

"With an increase in GP, urologists need to know the specific differences, medical implications, significant short- and long-term health risks, and patients concerns to treat and counsel patients in a culturally sensitive manner. Targeted educational strategies should be developed. Considering the amount of body modification, including GP, better legislation for public safety is overdue," the authors write.

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