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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2011 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: December 01, 2011.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for November 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

U.S. Patients Highly Satisfied With Outpatient Medical Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients in the United States are, in general, highly satisfied with their outpatient medical care, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Health Outcomes Research in Medicine.

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High-Performing Docs Learn Equally From Success, Failure

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among physicians making decisions in a medically-framed learning task, high and low performers show distinct behavioral and neural patterns of learning, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in PLoS One.

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Nearly One in 10 Patients With PCI Readmits Within 30 Days

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- About one in 10 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are readmitted within 30 days; and 30-day readmission is associated with an increased risk of one-year mortality, according to a study published online Nov. 28 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Autoimmune Disorders Tied to Pulmonary Embolism Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Autoimmune disorders are associated with an increased risk of pulmonary embolism, particularly during the first year after hospitalization, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in The Lancet.

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Substance Abuse Health Programs Benefit Surgeons

FRIDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Surgeons being monitored for diagnosed substance use disorders have similar outcomes to their non-surgeon counterparts, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Drugs ID'd in Most Older Adult Emergency Hospitalizations

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Adverse drug events from commonly used medications, including warfarin, insulin, oral antiplatelet agents, and oral hypoglycemic agents, account for the majority of emergency hospitalizations in older adults in the United States, according to a study published in the Nov. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Dabigatran Poses Challenge in Treating Injured Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Dabigatran etexilate, a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor, should be used with caution due to a lack of readily available methods to assess the degree of anticoagulation or reverse its effects, posing a threat of fatal bleeding complications for injured patients, according to a letter published in the Nov. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Prolonged LDL-Lowering Statin Treatment Beneficial, Safe

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged statin treatment reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and is accompanied by a proportional decrease in vascular events, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in The Lancet.

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Ambulatory Systolic BP Tied to White Matter Hyperintensity

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Among older individuals, ambulatory systolic blood pressure (BP), but not clinic BP, is associated with longitudinal progression of white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, according to a study published in the Nov. 22 issue of Circulation.

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Urinary Potassium, Sodium Excretion Tied to CV Events

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Estimated urinary sodium and potassium excretion are associated with cardiovascular (CV) events, according to a study published in the Nov. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Valvular Surgery Tied to Reduced Mortality in Endocarditis

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with infective endocarditis complicated by heart failure, valvular surgery is strongly associated with lower in-hospital and one-year mortality, according to a study published the Nov. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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BMI Predicts 30-Day Post-Surgery Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) is a significant predictor of 30-day mortality after surgical procedures, irrespective of the type of surgery, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Adverse Effects of Pediatric Acupuncture Usually Mild

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of adverse effects (AEs) associated with pediatric acupuncture are mild in severity, according to a review published online Nov. 21 in Pediatrics.

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High Early Adulthood BP Ups Mortality Risk in Later Years

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Men with higher blood pressure in early adulthood have an increased risk of overall, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in later life, according to a study published in the Nov. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Nonpunitive Method Improves Medical Error Reporting

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Medical error reporting in an academic pediatric ambulatory practice can be improved by a voluntary, nonpunitive, error-reporting system, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in Pediatrics.

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Restrictive Policies Push Gene Influence on Smoking Behavior

MONDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to dizygotic twins, monozygotic twins are more likely to quit smoking during a similar time frame, and the influence of genetic factors was more pronounced in 1975 to 1980 than in 1960 to 1974, coincident with the implententation of restrictive smoking legislation, according to a study published in the November issue of Demography.

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Factors Impacting Assignment to Triage Risk Level 2/3 ID'd

FRIDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A triage nurse's decision to assign a patient to risk level 2 or 3 of the Emergency Severity Index (ESI) triage system is influenced by specific factors, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Long-Term Antiepileptic Drug Therapy Ups Atherosclerosis

FRIDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with epilepsy, long-term monotherapy with carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), or valproic acid (VPA), but not lamotrigine (LTG), is associated with increased common carotid artery intima media thickness (CCA IMT) and altered circulatory markers of vascular risk, according to a study published online Nov. 15 in Epilepsia.

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Hyperglycemia, Mortality Linked in Pulmonary Embolism

THURSDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated glucose levels are common among patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), and are independently associated with increased 30-day mortality, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in Diabetes Care.

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Retinal Changes Tied to Impaired Daily Living Activities

THURSDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of two or more retinal microvascular changes in community-dwelling older adults is associated with increased disability in performance of activities of daily living (ADL), according to a study published online Nov. 14 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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AHA Policy Statement on Cardiac Rehabilitation Issued

THURSDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with cardiovascular disease, participation in cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs (CR/SPPs) can be enhanced by overcoming patient and health care system-related barriers, and implementing new methods and policies for referral and enrollment, according to an American Heart Association policy statement published online Nov. 14 in Circulation.

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Obese to Nonobese BMI Change Lowers Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who are overweight or obese in childhood and nonobese as adults have a cardiovascular-risk profile similar to those who were never obese, according to a study published in the Nov. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Patient-Doctor Intervention Doesn't Aid Cholesterol Levels

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- An intervention based on patient activation and a physician decision support tool does not appear to offer any benefit in improving cholesterol management in primary care practices, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Patients Without Insurance Have Shorter Hospital Stays

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients without Medicaid or any other insurance, with ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) or non-ACSCs, have shorter lengths of stay in hospitals than patients with insurance, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Twelve-Week Warfarin Dose Test Noninferior to Four-Week

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Assessing warfarin dosing every 12 weeks is noninferior to assessment every four weeks, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Panel Recommends Cholesterol Screenings for Children

MONDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- New guidelines sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommend screening children as young as 9 years old for high cholesterol; the guidelines have been summarized and published online Nov. 11 in Pediatrics.

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Transient Ischemic Attack Reduces Life Expectancy

FRIDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Transient ischemic attack (TIA) reduces life expectancy, particularly in patients older than 65 years or with a previous history of stroke and heart problems, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in Stroke.

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Half of U.S. Adult Smokers Tried to Quit Last Year

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of adults who smoke would like to quit, but only about a third of them seek medical help and/or support to do so, according to research published in the Nov. 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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FDA: Manufacturer Recalls Operating Room Tables

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Mizuho OSI Modular Table Systems are the subject of a class I recall following reports of patient injury, according to a recall notice issued Nov. 9 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Mizuho OSI Modular Table Systems Recall Notice
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Glove Use Linked to Reduced Hand Hygiene Compliance

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Glove usage among healthcare workers is often inappropriate, and hand hygiene compliance is worse when gloves are worn, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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Evidence Shows Reduced Sodium Intake Lowers BP

THURSDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Reduced sodium intake is associated with a significant decrease in blood pressure (BP), and a concomitant increase in plasma levels of renin, aldosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline, cholesterol, and triglycerides, according to a review published online Nov. 9 in the American Journal of Hypertension.

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Trilipix Not Found to Reduce Risk of Coronary Events

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Trilipix (fenofibric acid), a cholesterol-lowering medication, may not reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke, and physicians should consider the risks and benefits of the drug before prescribing it to patients, according to a safety communication issued Nov. 9 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Biolimus Stents Noninferior to Sirolimus Stents

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Biodegradable biolimus-eluting stents (BES) are noninferior to durable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) in coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study published online Nov. 9 in The Lancet to coincide with its presentation at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics meeting, held from Nov. 7 to 11 in San Francisco.

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Indoor Air Laws Up Adoption of Smokefree-Home Policy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Clean indoor air laws are associated with increased adoption of smokefree-home policies; and complete home smoking bans more than tripled among U.S. households from 1992/1993 to 2006/2007, according to two studies published online Nov. 8 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Post-Revascularization Stress Testing Billing Ups Its Use

TUESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who bill for stress testing after coronary revascularization perform the testing more often than those who do not bill, according to a study published in the Nov. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Guidelines Released

TUESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common cardiovascular disorder, and following diagnosis, patients should be managed at centers of clinical excellence, according to a scientific statement published online Nov. 8 in Circulation.

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No Added Benefits of Cranial Bypass in Stroke Prevention

TUESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery in addition to medical therapy offers no additional benefit over medical therapy alone in preventing recurrent stroke in recent symptomatic atherosclerotic internal carotid artery occlusion (AICAO), according to a study published in the Nov. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Great Achievement at Young Age Function of Time, Not Field

MONDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The frequency of great scientific achievements at young age is a function of time, and not related to the field, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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K2 Linked to Cases of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

MONDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Use of K2, a synthetic cannabinoid, among adolescents is associated with ST-segment elevation-myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online Nov. 7 in Pediatrics.

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Exercise Lowers CVD Death Risk Irrespective of Metabolic Factors

MONDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity is associated with lower risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, independent of metabolic risk factors, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Xarelto Approved to Prevent Stroke in Patients With A-Fib

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The anti-clotting drug Xarelto (rivaroxaban) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent stroke in people with atrial fibrillation, a common form of irregular heartbeat.

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Statin Use in BAV Stenosis Tied to Ascending Aortic Size

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Statin treatment in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) stenosis is associated with significantly lower ascending aortic size, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation Post-Stroke ID'd

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For smokers who have a stroke, only 40 percent are nonsmokers at one year following stroke, with insular damage and prestroke intention to stop smoking strongly influencing smoking cessation, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in Stroke.

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Receptionists Contribute to Safety of Repeat Prescriptions

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Receptionists and administrative staff of general practices in the United Kingdom make important contributions to quality and safety in repeat prescribing, which are often unknown to clinicians, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in BMJ.

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AHA/ACCF Guidelines for Heart Disease Updated

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), and atherosclerotic vascular disease, health care practitioners should implement appropriate treatment based on evidence-based guidelines and assess their success, according to a scientific statement published online Nov. 3 in Circulation.

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Adoption of English Diet Could Reduce U.K. Mortality

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Following a diet with nutritional quality equivalent to the English diet would substantially reduce mortality in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in BMJ Open.

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Rooms of Patients With A. baumannii Often Contaminated

FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of rooms of patients colonized or infected with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) (MDR-AB) have surfaces which are positive for A. baumannii, even in patients with a remote history of infection, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Artificial Heart Valve Doesn't Require Open-Heart Surgery

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The first artificial heart valve that can replace a diseased aortic valve without requiring open-heart surgery has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Risks for C. difficile Infection, Colonization Identified

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health care-associated Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and colonization are differentially associated with defined host and pathogen variables, according to a study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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No Medicare Savings From Disease-Management Hotline

THURSDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Commercial disease-management companies using nurse-based call centers modestly improve quality-of-care measures in Medicare fee-for-service programs with no evident reduction in costs of care or acute care utilization, according to a study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Childhood Diet Tied to Adult Glycemic, BP Control

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Following a low-fat and high-fiber diet in childhood and adolescence may improve long-term glycemic control and lower blood pressure in adult women, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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CDC: Opioid Overdoses Have Reached Epidemic Proportions

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid pain relievers (OPR) are involved in most drug overdose deaths; and OPR-related deaths, sales, and treatment admissions have increased in the last decade, according to a report published in the Nov. 1 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Gender Not an Independent Mortality Predictor Post-PCI

TUESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Gender is not an independent predictor of mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the drug eluting stent (DES) era, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Solid Organ Transplantation Tied to Increased Risk of Cancer

TUESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Recipients of kidney, liver, heart, or lung transplants are at an increased risk for both infection-related and unrelated cancers, according to a study published in the Nov. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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ADHD Drug Use Not Tied to Serious Cardiovascular Events

TUESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Current use of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drugs is not associated with a significantly increased risk of serious cardiovascular events, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Hand-Held Metal Detectors Safe With Implanted Devices

TUESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to hand-held metal detectors does not affect the function of pacemakers or implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Anesthesia Type Impacts Aortic Aneurysm Repair Outcome

TUESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Use of general anesthesia in endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVARs) is associated with an increase in pulmonary morbidity and length of stay (LOS) compared to spinal or local/monitored anesthesia care (local/MAC), according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Vascular Surgery.

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