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December 2011 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

Last Updated: January 02, 2012.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for December 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Oseltamivir-Resistant H1N1 Identified in Australia

THURSDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Oseltamivir-resistant prepandemic seasonal influenza 1 (H1N1) viruses with a neuraminidase substitution (H275Y) (A[H1N1]pdm09) have been identified in Australia, according to a letter published in the Dec. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Letter

Perceptions of Inappropriate Care Prevalent Among ICU Staff

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Perceptions of inappropriate care are prevalent among intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians in Europe and Israel, according to a study published in the Dec. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Extended Nevirapine Reduces Breastfeeding HIV Transmission

FRIDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prophylactic nevirapine is safe and can reduce mother-to-child Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) transmission during breastfeeding up to 6 months of age, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in The Lancet.

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Isentress Approval Expanded to Include Children and Teens

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Approval for the HIV drug Isentress (raltegravir) has been expanded to include children and adolescents ages 2 to 18, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday.

HIV/AIDS

Physician Opinions on Benefits of Open Visit Notes Vary

MONDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) have varied opinions about open access to doctors' notes; and most users of a personal health record (PHR) system are interested in sharing access to their information, according to two studies published in the Dec. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Walker
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Abstract - Zulman
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Patient Isolation During Hospitalization Tied to Delirium

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who are newly placed under contact precautions during hospitalization are at a higher risk for delirium, according to a study published in the January issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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Infection Prevention Up in VA, Non-Federal Hospitals

TUESDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- From 2005 to 2009, there was a significant increase in the use of hospital-acquired infection (HAI) prevention practices in non-federal and Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, according to a study published online Dec. 6 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Factors Affecting Micro-RNA Detection Accuracy Identified

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Accurate detection and quantitation of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) is affected by inherent differences in plasma samples, methods used for their collection and analysis, and the presence of specific inhibitors in plasma, according to a study published online Dec. 9 in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.

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Chronic Migraine Most Common Headache in HIV/AIDS Patients

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Headache is prevalent among patients with HIV/AIDS, with chronic migraine being the most common type of primary headache disorder, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in Headache.

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Medical Students Fail to ID Hand Hygiene Indications

MONDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students who are about to start the clinical phase of their education have a lack of knowledge regarding the correct indications for hand disinfection, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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