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Suspected Viruses Don’t Cause Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Last Updated: September 19, 2012.

There is no relationship between chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis and either xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus or polytropic murine leukemia virus, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in mBio.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- There is no relationship between chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) and either xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) or polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV), according to a study published online Sept. 18 in mBio.

Harvey J. Alter, M.D., from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues blindly analyzed peripheral blood samples from a diverse population of 147 patients with CFS/ME and 146 healthy subjects.

The researchers found no evidence of either XMRV or pMLV infection in the CFS/ME patients or the control subjects. For quality assurance, separate positive and negative controls confirmed that the diagnostic assays were functioning correctly.

"Here, the original investigators who found XMRV and pMLV in blood of subjects with this disorder report that this association is not confirmed in a blinded analysis of samples from rigorously characterized subjects," the authors write.

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