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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2012 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: December 03, 2012.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for November 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Managing Erectile Dysfunction, Comorbid Diseases Linked

FRIDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnosis and management of erectile dysfunction (ED) improves health outcomes for men with comorbid diseases, and vice versa, according to research published online Nov. 15 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Editorial: Too Much Vigorous Exercise Can Damage Heart

THURSDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Limiting vigorous exercise to 30 to 50 minutes a day will ensure cardiovascular benefit, without risking cardiovascular damage, according to an editorial published online Nov. 29 in Heart.

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Removal of Consultation Fees Increased Spending on Doc Visits

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The 2010 Medicare elimination of consultation payments (mainly billed by specialists) led to a net increase in spending on physician office visits, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Political Leaders Face Voter Opposition to Medicare Cuts

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of those who voted for President Obama in the 2012 election favor implementing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), while those who voted for Republican officeholders are likely to oppose parts or all of the implementation of the ACA; both sides oppose cuts to Medicare as a means to balance the budget, according to an analysis of newly released polls published as a Special Report online Nov. 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cigarette Tax Would Cost Federal Government in Long Term

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A theoretical additional federal excise tax on cigarettes would lead to greater federal outlays over time because of the population's increased longevity, according to a perspective piece published in the Nov. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Digoxin Found to Increase Mortality in A-Fib Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Digoxin is linked with a significant increase in mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to results from a study published online Nov. 27 in the European Heart Journal.

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Adding Fitness to Statin Rx Significantly Improves Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with dyslipidemia, the combination of statin treatment and increased fitness results in substantially lower mortality risk than either alone, according to a study published online Nov. 28 in The Lancet.

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State Cost of Affordable Care Act's Medicaid Expansion Modest

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion will likely result in modest state costs by 2022, but will gain health care coverage for more than 20 million uninsured Americans, according to report published by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Survival Benefit of Two Heart Failure Therapies Re-Examined

TUESDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Two observational studies examining the effectiveness of two heart failure therapies in clinical practice appear to contradict the results of randomized clinical trials, according to research published in the Nov. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Warfarin D/C Within 180 Days Post-Surgery May Up Mortality

TUESDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement surgery and discontinue anticoagulant treatment within six months have a greater risk of cardiovascular death, according to a study published in the Nov. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Doc Earnings Growth Lags Behind Other Health Professionals

TUESDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with other health professionals, in the last 15 years there has been considerably less growth in the earnings of physicians in the United States, according to a research letter published in the Nov. 28 issue the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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ECG Screening of Athletes in the U.S. Would Be Too Costly

TUESDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A national electrocardiographic (ECG) screening program for athletes in the United States would result in huge costs per life saved, according to a study published in the Dec. 4 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Growing Number of Drugs Possibly Inhibited by Grapefruit

TUESDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There are increasing numbers of newly marketed drugs that have the potential to interact with grapefruit, all of which are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme (CYP3A4), according to a review published online Nov. 26 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Hemorrhage Rates Highest Within 30 Days of Warfarin Tx

MONDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For older patients with atrial fibrillation starting on warfarin, the rates of hemorrhage are highest within the first 30 days, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Ranbaxy Issues Recall of 41 Batches of Atorvastatin

MONDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd., one of India's biggest pharmaceutical companies, has issued a voluntary recall for 41 batches of its generic version of atorvastatin calcium (Lipitor), with the full knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Growth in Health Benefit Cost Per Employee Slowed in 2012

FRIDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In 2012, growth in the average total health benefit cost per employee slowed to 4.1 percent, according to the National Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Plans, published Nov. 14 by Mercer.

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Endovascular, Open Aneurysm Repair Long-Term Survival Akin

THURSDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms, endovascular repair and open repair result in similar long-term survival, according to a study published in the Nov. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Obama Administration Moving Forward With Health Care Law

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Three rules have been proposed by the Obama administration to further facilitate implementation of the Affordable Care Act, according to a Nov. 20 press release from the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

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CDC: Designated Airport Smoking Areas Pose Risk to All

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Airports with designated indoor smoking areas pose the risk of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure for workers and travelers, according to research published in the Nov. 20 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Review: Routine Physicals Don't Cut Morbidity, Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Routine health exams do not reduce overall, cardiovascular, or cancer-related morbidity or mortality, according to a review published online Nov. 20 in BMJ.

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Online Access by Patients to Health Records Ups Utilization

TUESDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients having online access to medical records and clinicians correlates with an increase in health care utilization, according to a study published in the Nov. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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HeartWare Device Approved for Heart Transplant Hopefuls

TUESDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The HeartWare Ventricular Assist System, a left ventricular assist device to help people with end-stage heart failure who are awaiting a transplant, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Energy Content of Fast-Food Menu Items Has Changed Little

TUESDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The energy content of U.S. fast-food restaurant lunch and dinner menu items has changed little over a 14-year period from 1997 to 2010, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Heart Attack Risk Increases With Unemployment

TUESDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged and older individuals in the United States who have experienced job losses are at higher risk of having a heart attack, particularly during the first year of unemployment, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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E. coli O157:H7 Not Found to Up Death, Cardiovascular Events

TUESDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Following a 2000 outbreak of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7, there has been no increase noted in the risk of cardiovascular disease or death, according to research published online Nov. 19 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Repeat Testing Common Among Medicare Beneficiaries

MONDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For Medicare beneficiaries, repeat testing within three years is common, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Mental Illness, Job Stress Both Factors in Physician Suicides

FRIDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of mental illness or job problems may make physicians more vulnerable to suicide than non-physicians, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in General Hospital Psychiatry.

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Diltiazem Relieves Capecitabine-Induced Chest Pain

FRIDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Secondary prophylaxis with diltiazem may offer cancer patients relief from capecitabine-induced chest pain and dyspnea and allow them to tolerate capecitabine treatment, according to a study published in the Dec. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Trastuzumab Ups Cardiac Risk for Older Women With Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For older women with early-stage breast cancer, treatment with trastuzumab correlates with increased rates of heart failure and cardiomyopathy, according to a study published online Nov. 14 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Drug-Eluting Stent Approved for Peripheral Arterial Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The Zilver PTX Drug-Eluting Peripheral Stent has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat peripheral arterial disease of the femoropopliteal artery.

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Exercise Protects Against Heart Failure Even at Advanced Ages

THURSDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among older adults, physical activity may protect against heart failure, as indicated by lower levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT), according to a study published online Nov. 14 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Pilates Is Beneficial Adjunctive Therapy in Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Pilates exercises may be a beneficial adjunctive treatment for patients with heart failure, offering functional capacity improvements, according to a study published in the December issue of Cardiovascular Therapeutics.

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Survival Improving After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past decade, there has been a trend toward improved survival and a decrease in neurologic disability following in-hospital cardiac arrest, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Meditation Linked to Lower Mortality, Heart Attack, Stroke

TUESDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the transcendental meditation (TM) stress reduction program correlates with a decrease in the risk of a composite of mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke in African-American men and women with coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study published online Nov. 13 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Fasting Times Have Little Correlation With Lipid Levels

MONDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In a large examination of laboratory data, fasting times were found to exhibit limited correlation with lipid levels, according to research published online Nov. 12 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Social Network Profile May Harm Medical Applicants

MONDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Social networking profiles may harm an applicant's chances of admission to medical school or a residency program, according to a study published online Nov. 8 in the Postgraduate Medical Journal.

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Increased Risk of Carotid Artery Wall Thickening in COPD

MONDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the likelihood of carotid artery thickening is increased and vulnerable lipid core plaques are more frequent than in controls with normal lung function, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Lean Process Methods Expedite Care in Ischemic Stroke

FRIDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Use of lean process improvement methodology can reduce the time to stroke care without compromising patient safety, according to a study published online Nov. 8 in Stroke.

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Higher Pulse Wave Velocity Seen in Well-Controlled Diabetes

FRIDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Pulse wave velocity is higher among patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes when compared to controls, and is associated with white matter lesions, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Diabetes Care.

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Even Physically Active Women Found to Sit Too Much

THURSDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy, middle- and older-aged women who meet the current exercise recommendations spend as much time sitting each week as women who do not exercise regularly, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

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18% of Patients Who Smoke Light Up While Hospitalized

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- About 18 percent of smokers report lighting up during a hospitalization, despite the smoke-free status of the hospital, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Home BP Monitoring May Not Benefit Stroke Patients With HTN

TUESDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Although home blood pressure monitoring does not correlate with a reduction in systolic blood pressure in an unselected population of patients with hypertension and a history of stroke, it may be beneficial for select groups of patients, according to research published online Nov. 5 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Sulfonylureas Up Cardio Events Versus Metformin

TUESDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Use of sulfonylureas for initial treatment of diabetes is associated with increased cardiovascular events and death compared with metformin, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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HTN Risk Up for African-American Live Kidney Donors

TUESDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- African-American live kidney donors have a significantly increased risk of hypertension compared with non-donors, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Telephone Call Intervention Helps Lower Blood Pressure

MONDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Automated weekly telephone calls for six weeks correlate with a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP) for patients with hypertension in low/middle income countries (LMICs), according to research published in the October issue of Telemedicine and e-Health.

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FDA Approves Expanded Use of Xarelto

MONDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Approval of the anti-clotting drug Xarelto (rivaroxaban) has been expanded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to include treating deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), and to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT and PE following initial treatment.

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AHA Reaffirms Sodium Reduction Advice

MONDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association (AHA) is reaffirming its 2011 advisory limiting sodium consumption to less than 1,500 mg per day, according to a scientific statement published online Nov. 2 in Circulation.

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Major Illness Increases Venous Thrombosis Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- People with major illnesses, including liver or kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, heart failure, hemorrhagic stroke, or arterial thrombosis, have an increased risk of venous thrombosis that dramatically increases during periods of immobilization or in the presence of thrombophilia, according to research published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Exercise Cuts Cognitive Deficit Risk for At-Risk Seniors

FRIDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- For older people with white matter changes living independently, physical activity lowers the risk of cognitive impairment, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in Stroke.

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NSAIDS Don't Affect C-Reactive Protein Levels in RA Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not have an effect on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to research published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Anticoagulation Therapy Appears to Be Safe After TAVI

THURSDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- After transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) there is no increased risk of bleeding or other adverse outcomes for those patients who have an indication for anticoagulant therapy, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

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