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November 2012 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Last Updated: December 03, 2012.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for November 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Risk Estimator ID'd for Sight-Threatening Diabetic Retinopathy

THURSDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Two consecutive annual digital retinal photographic screenings can be used to estimate the risk of future progression to sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR), according to a study published online Nov. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Retinal Prosthesis Allows Blind Patient to "Read"

THURSDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with retinal prostheses, text can be successfully stimulated to electrodes in the prosthesis system and read as visual Braille, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in the Frontiers in Neuroprosthetics.

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Political Leaders Face Voter Opposition to Medicare Cuts

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of those who voted for President Obama in the 2012 election favor implementing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), while those who voted for Republican officeholders are likely to oppose parts or all of the implementation of the ACA; both sides oppose cuts to Medicare as a means to balance the budget, according to an analysis of newly released polls published as a Special Report online Nov. 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Removal of Consultation Fees Increased Spending on Doc Visits

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The 2010 Medicare elimination of consultation payments (mainly billed by specialists) led to a net increase in spending on physician office visits, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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State Cost of Affordable Care Act's Medicaid Expansion Modest

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion will likely result in modest state costs by 2022, but will gain health care coverage for more than 20 million uninsured Americans, according to report published by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Doc Earnings Growth Lags Behind Other Health Professionals

TUESDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with other health professionals, in the last 15 years there has been considerably less growth in the earnings of physicians in the United States, according to a research letter published in the Nov. 28 issue the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Obama Administration Moving Forward With Health Care Law

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Three rules have been proposed by the Obama administration to further facilitate implementation of the Affordable Care Act, according to a Nov. 20 press release from the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

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Mental Illness, Job Stress Both Factors in Physician Suicides

FRIDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of mental illness or job problems may make physicians more vulnerable to suicide than non-physicians, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in General Hospital Psychiatry.

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Genotyping IDs Long-Term Risk of Macular Degeneration

TUESDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Genotyping of two genetic risk alleles can be used to estimate the long-term risk of early and late age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but knowing the phenotype is important in assessing risk when early AMD is present, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Social Network Profile May Harm Medical Applicants

MONDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Social networking profiles may harm an applicant's chances of admission to medical school or a residency program, according to a study published online Nov. 8 in the Postgraduate Medical Journal.

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