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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2013 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: February 01, 2013.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for January 2013. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Updated Guidelines Issued for Care of Acute Ischemic Stroke

THURSDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute ischemic stroke, the keys to limiting associated morbidity and mortality include the recognition of stroke, early diagnosis and treatment, and hospital care, according to updated guidelines published online Jan. 31 in Stroke.

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Low Diuretic Use in Home Care for Blacks With Hypertension

THURSDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of black patients enrolled in an urban home health organization who have uncontrolled hypertension are not receiving diuretic antihypertensive medication, despite guideline recommendations regarding the important role diuretics play in hypertension control, according to research published in the February issue of the American Journal of Hypertension.

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Kynamro Approved for Genetic Condition Tied to Cholesterol

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Kynamro (mipomersen sodium) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a rare inherited condition in which the body can't remove low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from the blood, as an addition to lipid-lowering medications and diet.

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Common Obesity Beliefs Often Unsupported by Science

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many commonly held beliefs about obesity and weight loss are not supported by scientific evidence, according to a study published in the Jan. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Yoga Shown to Reduce Clinical Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga significantly reduces clinical symptoms and improves quality-of-life measures in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Study Confirms Prolongation of QT Interval With Citalopram

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including citalopram, escitalopram, and amitriptyline, are associated with prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in BMJ.

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Bile Acid Sequestrant Reduces Glucose Concentration in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes taking metformin monotherapy, the bile acid sequestrant colesevelam reduces fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations without any effects on insulin concentration, secretion, or action, according to research published online Dec. 18 in Diabetes.

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Majority of Patients Will Consider ICD Deactivation

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) would want ICD deactivation in at least one scenario describing deteriorating health outcomes common in patients approaching the end of life, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Physicians Commonly Report Unsafe Hospital Workloads

TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians say they often face unsafe hospital workloads, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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In STEMI, Diabetes Linked to Worse Long-Term Outcomes

TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing primary angioplasty for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), diabetes is associated with worse long-term outcomes, including mortality, reinfarction, stent thrombosis, and target vessel revascularization (TVR), according to research published online Dec. 28 in Diabetes Care.

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Brain Scans Show Doctors Empathize With Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who empathize with a patient in pain and feel relief when the patient receives effective treatment show activity in brain regions associated with pain relief and reward, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in Molecular Psychiatry.

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In CAD, Highest Mortality Risk for Central Obesity, Normal BMI

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD), central obesity in combination with normal weight is associated with the highest risk of mortality, according to research published in the Feb. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Less CVD Hospitalization When SBP, LDL-C Controlled in T2DM

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes with controlled systolic blood pressure (SBP) or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) have significantly lower rates of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially when both risk factors are controlled, according to research published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Modified DASH Intervention Feasible for African-Americans

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For African-Americans in an under-resourced community, use of a modified Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-intervention is feasible, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Prehospital Antiplatelets Improve Graft Intervention Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Prehospital use of antiplatelet therapy, either aspirin/clopidogrel or dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), is associated with a lower incidence of major adverse cardiac events after saphenous vein graft (SVG) intervention, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Community-Based Study IDs Prevalence of HTN in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension is lower than previously reported in school-based cohorts, according to a large community-based study published online Jan. 28 in Pediatrics.

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Weight Counseling Declining Among Primary Care Doctors

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- From 1995-1996 to 2007-2008, the rate of weight counseling provided by primary care physicians (PCPs) decreased significantly, even for those patients with obesity and weight-related comorbidities such as diabetes and hypertension, according to research published in the February issue of Medical Care.

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Sclerostin Linked to Vascular Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Circulating levels of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor sclerostin are higher in patients with type 2 diabetes who also have atherosclerotic disease, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in Diabetes Care.

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Increases in Mean Platelet Volume After PCI Tied to Death

FRIDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), mortality is associated with increases in mean platelet volume (MPV) over time following the procedure, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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ACPE Survey Finds Skepticism Relating to Online Doc Ratings

THURSDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are skeptical of online ratings, and believe that few patients use them, according to a survey published by the American College of Physician Executives (ACPE).

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Retinopathy Severity Linked to Cardiovascular Outcome

THURSDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with type 2 diabetes, incident cardiovascular outcomes are determined not only by the severity of diabetic retinopathy but also by its progression, according to research published online Dec. 13 in Diabetes Care.

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Physician Education Ups Communication for New Meds

THURSDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A physician-targeted education session improves physician communication about newly-prescribed medications, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Risk of Death Up for PE Patients With High Plasma Lactate Levels

THURSDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adult patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) with elevated plasma lactate levels are at a high risk of death and adverse outcomes, regardless of whether they also present with shock or hypotension; right-sided ventricular dysfunction; or elevation of troponin I, according to research published online Jan. 9 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Smoking Cuts Life Expectancy by More Than 10 Years

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers typically die at least a decade earlier than nonsmokers, but this can be at least partially reversed by quitting smoking, according to a study published in the Jan. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CPR Duration Inversely Tied to Child Cardiac Arrest Survival

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA), the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is inversely linked to survival and favorable neurologic outcomes, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Circulation.

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Large Teaching Hospitals Face More Readmission Penalties

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Large hospitals, teaching hospitals, and safety-net hospitals (SNHs) are more likely than other hospitals to be penalized under the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP), according to a research letter published in the Jan. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low Ratio of n3:n6 Fatty Acids Correlates With CAD Progression

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For statin-treated patients with coronary artery disease, decreases in the ratio of serum n-3 to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) correlate with atherosclerosis progression, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Fatty Liver May Directly Mediate CAD in Metabolic Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Men and women with fatty liver are more likely to have metabolic syndrome (MetS) with type 2 diabetes, and women with fatty liver are more likely to have MetS with subclinical atherosclerosis, according to research published online Dec. 18 in Diabetes Care.

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Care Transition Initiative Decreases Rehospitalizations

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Communities instituting quality improvement initiatives for care transitions see significant declines in the rate of 30-day rehospitalizations and hospitalizations, according to a study published in the Jan. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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New Guidelines Issued for MCS Device Use in Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation has developed practice guidelines on the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices in the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure; the guidelines have been published in the February issue of The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

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ER Visits Frequent Within 30-Days of Hospital Discharge

TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department visits account for almost 40 percent of post-discharge acute care encounters; and readmissions within 30-days occur in a considerable proportion of patients hospitalized with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction (MI), and pneumonia, according to two studies published in the Jan. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Vashi
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Abstract - Dharmarajan
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In STEMI, C-Reactive Protein at Presentation Predicts MI, Death

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) measurements at presentation predict subsequent nonfatal MI and cardiac death; and for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), fetuin-A and CRP have prognostic value, according to two studies published in the Jan. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Predicts Cardiovascular Death in T2DM

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery calcium (CAC) predicts the risk of cardiovascular death, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in Diabetes Care.

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BCIS Myocardial Jeopardy Score Predicts Post-PCI Death

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The British Cardiovascular Intervention Society myocardial jeopardy score (BCIS-JS) predicts mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Physical Activity Requirement in <40 Percent of College Programs

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with historic levels, as of 2010, less than 40 percent of four-year universities and colleges in the United States have a physical education requirement for graduation with a baccalaureate degree, according to research published in the December issue of Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport.

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Efforts Failed to Up Primary Care, Rural Resident Training

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The 2005 redistribution of graduate medical education (GME) funds did little to train more residents in primary care and in rural areas, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Tricuspid Regurgitant Jet Velocity Up in Childhood Cancer Survivors

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- About one-quarter of adult survivors of childhood cancer who received chest-directed radiation therapy (RT) have increased tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV), according to research published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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FDA: Octaplas Approved for Blood-Clotting Disorders

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Octaplas has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to augment insufficient clotting proteins that could otherwise lead to excessive bleeding or excessive clotting.

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Fasting Plasma Glucose Beats HbA1c for Diabetes Screening

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- For patients without diabetes undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) performs better in diabetes screening than glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), according to a study published online Dec. 13 in Diabetes Care.

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Even Brief Interruptions Dramatically Increase Errors

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Even momentary interruptions of two to four seconds can significantly affect a person's ability to accurately complete a task requiring considerable thought, according to research published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.

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Family Docs Are Early Adopters of Electronic Health Records

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Family practice physicians are adopting electronic health record (EHR) systems at a fast pace, with 68 percent using an EHR system by 2011, and 80 percent expected to be users by 2013, according to research published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Prehospital Advanced Airway Use Hurts Neurologic Outcome

TUESDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), the odds of favorable neurologic outcome are significantly reduced with advanced airway management versus conventional bag-valve-mask ventilation, according to a study published in the Jan. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Certain Online Behaviors of Docs Warrant Investigation

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- There is high consensus among state medical boards regarding the likelihood of probable investigations for certain online behaviors, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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High Anthocyanin Intake Tied to Lower MI Risk in Younger Women

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- High intake of a specific sub-class of flavonoids, called anthocyanins, is associated with a reduced risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in young and middle-aged women, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of Circulation.

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Top Five Issues for Docs and Patients Identified for 2013

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The top five issues that will impact physicians and patients in 2013 have been identified, according to a report published Dec. 10 by The Physicians Foundation.

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National U.S. Health Care Spending Relatively Stable

FRIDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The growth in national U.S. health care spending was relatively stable in 2011, but growth in personal health care spending accelerated, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Post-Op Mortality Up for Elderly With Pre-Heart Op Anxiety

THURSDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Few elderly patients about to undergo cardiac surgery experience high levels of anxiety, but for those who do, there is a five-fold higher risk of postoperative major morbidity or mortality, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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SPIRIT 2013 Clinical Trial Protocol Guidelines Issued

THURSDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A panel of experts, including trial investigators, trial coordinators, and representatives from ethics and regulatory agencies, has developed the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) 2013 guidelines for the minimum content of a clinical trial, according to a statement published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Americans Sicker, Die Younger Than Other Developed Nations

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Americans have worse health than their peers in high-income countries, according to a report published Jan. 9 by the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine.

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Multiple Stressors Contribute to Readmission Within 30 Days

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-fifth of Medicare patients discharged from the hospital are readmitted within 30 days, which seems to arise from a combination of factors contributing to patient vulnerability, according to research published in the Jan. 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Two HTN Meds Plus NSAIDs Ups Acute Kidney Injury Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Use of triple therapy comprising diuretics and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers, together with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury, particularly in the first 30 days of treatment, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in BMJ.

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Health Care Use Dropped Among All During Recession

TUESDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use declined significantly among all races and ethnicities during the recession from 2007 to 2009, with the only ethnic disparity being fewer physician visits by Hispanics compared with whites, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Fetuin-A Levels Linked to Cardiovascular Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly individuals without type 2 diabetes, high levels of fetuin-A, a protein that inhibits arterial calcification and insulin action, is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in Diabetes Care.

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Shared Savings May Promote Care Coordination Entity Use

MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Use of shared savings could encourage individuals who are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid to enroll in state-designed care coordination entities (CCEs), according to a perspective piece published online Jan. 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Metformin Cuts Cardio Events in High-Risk Type 2 Diabetes

MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin therapy significantly reduces cardiovascular events in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes compared to treatment with glipizide, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in Diabetes Care.

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Low Rates of High Platelet Reactivity With Prasugrel Tx

MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with percutaneous coronary intervention and a maintenance dose of prasugrel is associated with low rates of high platelet reactivity (HPR), ischemic events, and major bleeding in the first 30 days of treatment, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Improved Staffing Cuts Medicare Patient Readmissions

FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital nurses with good work environments who are caring for fewer patients have significantly fewer elderly Medicare patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction (MI), and pneumonia who are readmitted to the hospital within the first 30 days, according to research published in the January issue of Medical Care.

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Patient-Doctor Communication Affects Medication Adherence

FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Poor communication between patients and health care providers is linked to lower cardiometabolic medication adherence, according to a study published online Dec. 31 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Eliquis Approved for People With Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The anticoagulant Eliquis (apixaban) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help prevent stroke and dangerous blood clots in people with atrial fibrillation that isn't caused by a heart valve problem.

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Smoking Impairs Saphenous Vein Conduits in CABG Surgery

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing heart bypass surgery using saphenous veins are more likely to have signs of graft failure if they are smokers, even if they quit smoking more than a year earlier, according to a study published in the January issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Survival Similar for ICDs in Trials and Clinical Practice

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Survival is similar for patients who receive implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) as part of a randomized clinical trial or in routine clinical practice for primary prevention, according to research published in the Jan. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Association Between Health Care Cost, Quality Inconsistent

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The direction of the association between health care cost and quality is unclear, with inconsistent evidence indicating positive, negative, mixed, and indeterminate associations, according to a review published in the Jan. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Telmisartan Reverses Insulin Resistance in Mice

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Treating mice fed a high-fat diet with telmisartan reverses insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, but only when the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPAR-δ) gene is present, according to a study published online Dec. 13 in Diabetes.

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House Joins Senate to Avert Medicare Cuts

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The House of Representatives settled on an 11th-hour agreement late Tuesday night that has averted the widespread tax increases and spending cuts that would have gone into effect January 1. This agreement occurred 21 hours after the U.S. Senate did its part to steer the country clear of the "fiscal cliff."

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Review: All-Cause Mortality Down for Mildly Overweight

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity (all grades combined) and grades 2 and 3 obesity, based on standard body mass index (BMI) categories, correlate with increased risk of all-cause mortality, while overweight is associated with decreased risk compared with normal weight, according to a review published in the Jan. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Travel-Based Interventions May Be As Effective As Diet on BMI

TUESDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting car travel can be as effective as reducing calories in lowering body mass index (BMI), according to research published online Dec. 5 in Preventive Medicine.

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