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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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February 2013 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: March 01, 2013.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for February 2013. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Predictors of Mortality, CVD Risk in Cushing's Disease ID'd

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A number of factors, including the duration of glucocorticoid exposure, older age at diagnosis, and preoperative adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentration, are associated with a higher risk of mortality in patients treated for Cushing's disease (CD), according to research published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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CMS Issues Final Rule on Physician Sunshine Act

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have issued a final rule requiring drug and device manufacturers and group purchasing organizations (GPOs) to report payment or gifts of more than $10 to physicians, hospitals, and other providers, and necessitating manufacturers and GPOs to report ownership or investment interests held by physicians or their family members.

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Variation ID'd in Increased Demand for Primary Care Docs

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although the anticipated increased demand for primary health care providers with implementation of the Affordable Care Act is unlikely to be disruptive overall, considerable variation exists in the proportional demand for additional primary care providers, according to research published online in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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Overall Sedentary Time Shows Major Cardiometabolic Impact

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with known risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus, sedentary time is detrimentally linked to cardiometabolic health markers, and may be a more important indicator than moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, according to research published online Feb. 27 in Diabetologia.

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Home-Based Telehealth Not Effective for Chronic Conditions

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Second-generation, home-based telehealth is no more effective than usual care for quality of life and psychological outcomes among patients with chronic health conditions, according to research published online Feb. 26 in BMJ.

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Aldosterone Blockade Ups Left Ventricular Diastolic Function

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, aldosterone blockade with spironolactone improves left ventricular diastolic function, but has no impact on maximal exercise capacity, quality of life, or patient symptoms, according to a study published in the Feb. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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List of Five Unnecessary Vascular Tests Released

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The Society for Vascular Medicine (SVM) has published "Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question" in vascular medicine, a list of five tests and procedures that are commonly used but can be unnecessary or even harmful.

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Preparation Underway for Implementation of ACA in 2014

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- As the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) nears, states are preparing for some of its provisions, including expanded access to Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and the use of information technology, according to a report issued by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Cardiologists Often Fail to Communicate Impact of ICDs

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- When communicating with patients about implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), cardiologists often misrepresent and omit information about the associated psychological and long-term risks, according to research published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Resilient Personality Linked to Cardiorespiratory Fitness

MONDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- While personality has no effect on energy expenditure at rest or during normal walking, people with a more resilient personality expend more energy when walking quickly, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in PLOS ONE.

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Insufficient Evidence to Support BP Screening for Children

MONDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force notes that there is insufficient evidence to indicate that hypertension screening in children and adolescents reduces adverse cardiovascular outcomes in adults. This Recommendation Statement is based on an evidence review published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Gene Therapy May Activate Stem Cells in Heart Failure Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Delivery of an SDF-1 encoding plasmid (JVS-100) acts a homing signal for stem cells and improves clinical status in patients with symptomatic heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (IsCM), according to a study published online Feb. 21 in Circulation Research.

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Polygenic Root Likely in Many Familial High Cholesterol Cases

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with familial hypercholesterolemia who do not have any of the known mutations, their high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels may have a polygenic cause, and for those with a detected mutation, the difference in disease penetrance may be explained by a polygenic contribution, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in The Lancet.

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Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Benefits Expanded

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In a final rule, which will make purchasing health coverage easier for consumers, mental health and substance use benefits will be expanded to 62 million Americans, according to a report published Feb. 20 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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Hands-On Cooking Education Aids Docs' Nutrition Knowledge

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Continuing education that includes didactic and hands-on cooking sessions improves physicians' self-reported nutrition-related behaviors, according to a research letter published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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CMS Proposes Payment and Policy Updates for 2014

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Payment and policy updates have been proposed for 2014, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Advanced Notice and draft Call Letter published Feb. 15.

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Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Teens Linked to Early Death

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking, central obesity, and poor glycemic control in teens and young adults correlate with an increased risk of premature death, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Air Pollution Ups Mortality Rate Post-ACS Hospitalization

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), exposure to higher levels of air pollution, specifically particulate matter with a diameter of ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5), correlates with increased all-cause mortality, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in the European Heart Journal.

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Report Discusses Impact of ACGME 2011 Requirements

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Although many residency program directors approve of individual components within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Common Program Requirements introduced in 2011, less than half express overall approval, according to a perspective piece published in the Feb. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Faster Adoption of Electronic Health Records Needed

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by health providers for Medicare is increasing, but not quickly enough to avoid penalties in 2015, according to a letter published in the Feb. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Women's Awareness of Heart Disease Improving

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past 15 years there has been an improvement in women's awareness of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but racial disparity still exists, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Circulation.

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Prognostic Value of CCTA Explored for Suspected CAD

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) without modifiable risk factors, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is an effective tool for determining the risk of heart attacks and other adverse cardiac events, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Radiology.

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Birth Order May Affect Metabolic, Cardiac Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Birth order may influence metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factors, including insulin sensitivity and daytime blood pressure, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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CMS: Unnecessary Medicare Regulations to Be Reformed

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare regulations which are unnecessary, obsolete, or excessively burdensome on hospital or health care providers will be reformed, according to a rule proposed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in response to the President's instructions in Executive Order 13563.

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Multimodality Approach Needed to Reengineer Health Care

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A multimodality approach focusing on reengineering the U.S. health care system may provide a way to improve quality and reduce costs, according to a viewpoint published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sleep Duration Linked to Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) is modestly higher for male physicians who sleep eight hours or more per night, while shorter sleep duration (six hours or less) is associated with a higher risk of AF in those with sleep apnea, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Patient Care

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Use of an artificial intelligence (AI) framework can improve patient outcomes at one-third of the costs of the current standard of care, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in Artificial Intelligence in Medicine.

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AMA Issues Code for Safe Care Transitions After Hospital Stay

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A series of five responsibilities and five principles should guide ambulatory practices to achieve safe and effective care transitions for patients after hospital stays, according to a report issued by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Ozone Levels, PM2.5 Linked to Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- There is an increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with higher levels of exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Circulation.

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Gender Influences Ischemic Time, Outcomes After STEMI

FRIDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- After ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), women have longer ischemic times and are at a higher risk than men of early all-cause and cardiac mortality, according to research published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Income Inequality Ups Risk for 30-Day Hospital Readmission

FRIDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For Medicare beneficiaries, income inequality correlates with 30-day readmission following hospitalization for myocardial infarction, heart failure, or pneumonia, according a study published online Feb. 14 in BMJ.

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Health Care-Associated Infections Decreased in 2011

FRIDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In 2011, decreases were noted for some health care-associated infections (HAIs), according to a report prepared by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Post-STEMI, Beta Blockers Cut Long-Term Mortality for Some

FRIDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), beta-blocker (BB) therapy is associated with reduced long-term mortality for those at higher risk, but not those at lower risk, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Depressed Patients Less Likely to Complete Cardiac Rehab

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Depressed patients are less likely to complete exercise-based, cardiac rehabilitation programs, regardless of whether they are taking antidepressants, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Snoring Tied to Increased Cardiovascular Risk in Women

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- For women, snoring is associated with a modest increased risk of stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD), and cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Emergency Room Crowding Tied to ACS-Induced PTSD

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to emergency department crowding correlates with acute coronary syndrome (ACS)-induced posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms one month after ACS, according to a research letter published online Feb. 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Psychological, Sexual Impact of Female Breadwinners Explored

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- For couples in which the wife earns more than the husband, there may be psychological and sexual implications, according to a study published in the March issue of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

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IOM Urges International Action to Eradicate Fake Drugs

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Falsified and substandard medications pose public health problems around the world, and international action should be taken to combat the phenomenon, according to a report published Feb. 13 by the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

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Oregon Experiment Will Provide Insight Into ACO-Based Reform

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The outcome of the Oregon experiment, an ambitious program centered on a model of an accountable care organization (ACO), will offer important lessons for the wider implementation of ACOs as cost-saving mechanisms, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Consumer Advocates Urge FDA to Set Sugar Limits for Soda

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Consumer advocates and nutrition experts, led by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), are petitioning the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to determine what levels of high-fructose corn syrup and other sweeteners in sodas and soft drinks are indeed safe.

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High Calcium Intake Linked to Increased Mortality in Women

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For women, high intake of calcium (>1,400 mg/day) is associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, according to a study published online Feb. 12 in BMJ.

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Health Insurance Exchanges Are Top Priority on U.S. Agenda

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The public's health care agenda places creation of a health insurance exchange or marketplace as a top priority, according to a report published by the Kaiser Family Foundation/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard School of Public Health.

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Gradual Dietary Sodium Reductions Will Save Lives

TUESDAY, Feb. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Substantial health benefits can likely be achieved if Americans gradually reduce their daily dietary sodium intake over the next decade, according to research published online Feb. 11 in Hypertension.

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No Link Between Mortality, Readmission Quality Measures

TUESDAY, Feb. 12 (HealthDay News) -- As measures of hospital quality, there is no association between risk-standardized mortality rates and readmission rates for elderly individuals hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction or pneumonia and a weak association for patients with heart failure, according to a study published in the Feb. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Vascular Brain Injury Has Negative Impact on Cognition

TUESDAY, Feb. 12 (HealthDay News) -- For elderly patients, vascular brain injury (VBI) is associated with lower cognitive performance, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in JAMA Neurology.

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Use of Evidence-Based Meds Increasing for STEMI, NSTEMI

TUESDAY, Feb. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence-based therapies are increasingly being used to treat patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), according to research published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Increasing Patient Activation Tied to Lower Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patient activation is associated with improved outcomes and lower health care costs, according to a review published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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Most Cardiac Patients Report Using Alternative Treatments

MONDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients with cardiovascular disease receiving outpatient cardiology evaluations report using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Incidence of Noncarotid Vascular Peri-Op Stroke 0.6 Percent

FRIDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The overall incidence of perioperative stroke is 0.6 percent within 30 days of noncarotid vascular surgery, and is associated with increased 30-day all-cause mortality and increased median surgical length of stay, according to a study published in the February issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Final HIPAA Omnibus Rule Goes Into Effect March 26

FRIDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The final omnibus rule, which makes changes to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996, goes into effect March 26, and physicians must be in compliance by Sept. 23.

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Most Dietary Supplement Use Not Recommended by Docs

FRIDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Adults frequently use dietary supplements, including multivitamins, calcium, and omega-3 or fish oil, to improve or maintain their health, and less than one-quarter of this use is on the basis of health care provider recommendation, according to research published online Feb. 4 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Findings Support Link Between hsCRP, Macular Degeneration

THURSDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Pooled results from five cohorts confirm that high levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) correlate with increased future risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to research published online Feb. 7 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Linoleic Acid May Increase Risk of Heart Disease, Death

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Substitution of dietary saturated fatty acids with linoleic acid seems to be associated with increased risks of all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease, and cardiovascular disease, according to research published online Feb. 5 in BMJ.

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Midway Waist Circumference Better Than Iliac Crest Measure

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Waist circumference measured midway (WC-mid) between the lowest ribs and the iliac crest better defines risks associated with central obesity than does waist circumference measured at the iliac crest (WC-IC), according to a study published online Dec. 28 in Diabetes Care.

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Ramipril Improves Walking in Peripheral Artery Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For elderly patients with peripheral artery disease and intermittent leg pain during walking, ramipril treatment for six months improves pain-free walking times and improves quality of life, according to a study published in the Feb. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physicians' Pay for Existing Patients Dropped in 2012

TUESDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' pay for existing patients dropped considerably in 2012, according to the results of the Fee Schedule Survey published Jan. 31 in Physicians Practice.

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Health-Plan, Employer-Based Programs Studied for Diabetes

TUESDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Health plan-initiated, employer-based wellness programs are being implemented to test new approaches to help reduce diabetes risk and, more broadly, to prevent chronic illness, according to research published online Jan. 31 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Lower Radiation Dose With Second-Generation CT Scanner

TUESDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A second-generation 320-detector row computed tomography (CT) scanner reduces radiation exposure for patients undergoing coronary CT angiography, while still providing excellent diagnostic image quality, according to research published online Jan. 22 in Radiology.

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Supplemental Calcium Tied to Higher CVD Death Risk in Men

TUESDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In men, supplemental calcium intake is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published online Feb. 4 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Higher Midlife Fitness Linked to Lower All-Cause Dementia Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with higher midlife cardiorespiratory fitness levels are significantly less likely to develop all-cause dementia later in life, according to research published in the Feb. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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FSMB: Approaches Explored for Expediting Multi-State Licenses

MONDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- New approaches are being explored for streamlining physician multi-state licensure to accommodate the use of telemedicine in the delivery of health care, according to a report from a meeting held from Jan. 16 to 17 by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB).

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Stopping Aspirin Therapy After GI Bleed Ups Cardiovascular Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with cardiovascular disease who discontinue low-dose aspirin therapy after peptic ulcer bleeding have a seven-fold higher risk of death or acute cardiovascular event, according to research published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Grape Polyphenols Counteract Fructose-Induced Effects

FRIDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Grape polyphenol (PP) supplementation prevents fructose-induced oxidative stress and insulin resistance in healthy volunteers with high metabolic risk, according to research published online Dec. 28 in Diabetes Care.

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Study Reviews Risk Factors for Chronic Disease in Vietnam

FRIDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Risk factors for chronic disease seem to be common in Vietnam, and include high blood pressure, increasing overweight and obesity, tobacco and alcohol use, and inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Knowing Cost of Imaging Tests Doesn't Cut Utilization

FRIDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians do not order fewer imaging tests if they are aware of the costs, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

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