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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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February 2013 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: March 01, 2013.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for February 2013. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Pediatricians Have Role to Play in School Discipline

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians can play various roles with respect to discipline in schools, including helping students affected by out-of-school suspension and assisting with positive behavior support, according to a policy statement published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Hyperbaric Oxygen No Benefit for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetic foot ulcers, use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is not associated with improved healing or with a decrease in the likelihood of amputation, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Diabetes Care.

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Glucagonlike Peptide 1-Based Tx Increases Pancreatitis Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Use of glucagonlike peptide 1 (GLP-1)-based therapies (GLP-1 mimetic, exenatide, and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor, sitagliptin phosphate) correlates with increased likelihood of hospitalization for acute pancreatitis among adults with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Urologic Patient Education Reading Materials Too Difficult

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Online urologic patient education materials (PEMs) are generally written above recommended reading levels, according to a study published in the March issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Glycemic Control Not Linked to Adverse Outcomes After TKA

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, diabetes (with or without poor glycemic control) is not associated with adverse surgical outcomes, according to research published online Feb. 27 in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Overall Sedentary Time Shows Major Cardiometabolic Impact

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with known risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus, sedentary time is detrimentally linked to cardiometabolic health markers, and may be a more important indicator than moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, according to research published online Feb. 27 in Diabetologia.

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ACOG Joins the Choosing Wisely Program

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (The College), in coordination with the American Board of Internal Medicine's Choosing Wisely campaign, has published the top five tests and procedures to question in obstetrics and gynecology.

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High ER Charges for Common Presenting Conditions

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Charges for common conditions that present to the emergency department are generally high, with considerable variability, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in PLOS ONE.

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Variation ID'd in Increased Demand for Primary Care Docs

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although the anticipated increased demand for primary health care providers with implementation of the Affordable Care Act is unlikely to be disruptive overall, considerable variation exists in the proportional demand for additional primary care providers, according to research published online in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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CDC Releases Disease Detective Game App for iPad

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The "Solve the Outbreak" iPad application allows gamers to play the role of a disease outbreak investigator and determine the cause of outbreaks, based on real-life events, according to a press release published Feb. 20 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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CMS Issues Final Rule on Physician Sunshine Act

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have issued a final rule requiring drug and device manufacturers and group purchasing organizations (GPOs) to report payment or gifts of more than $10 to physicians, hospitals, and other providers, and necessitating manufacturers and GPOs to report ownership or investment interests held by physicians or their family members.

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Review: Growing Body of Evidence Linking Diet to Acne

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence suggests that there may be a connection between acne and diet, particularly foods with a high glycemic index, according to a review published in the March issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Caffeine Linked to Low Birth Weight and SGA Babies

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal caffeine intake is associated with lower birth weight and increased odds of a baby being small for gestational age (SGA), but does not increase the risk of spontaneous preterm delivery (PTD), according to research published online Feb. 19 in BMC Medicine.

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Childhood Bullying Linked to Adult Psychiatric Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of childhood bullying last into adulthood for both victims and bullies, with the worst effects seen for those who are both victims and bullies, according to research published online Feb. 20 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Isotretinoin Not Linked to Increased Risk of IBD

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Among women of reproductive age, isotretinoin is not associated with an increased risk for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD), according to research published in the February issue of JAMA Dermatology.

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Ondansetron Not Linked to Adverse Fetal Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of ondansetron for treatment of nausea during pregnancy is not associated with any increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes, according to a study published in the Feb. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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FDA Approves Osphena for Dyspareunia Post-Menopause

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the once-daily pill Osphena (ospemifene) to treat postmenopausal women experiencing moderate-to-severe pain during sexual intercourse.

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HIV-HCV Coinfection Speeds HCV-Related Liver Fibrosis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who are coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) exhibit liver fibrosis similar to that of individuals without HIV who are nearly 10 years older, according to research published online Feb. 26 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Risk of Child Narcolepsy Up With Pandemrix Vaccination

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For children vaccinated with ASO3 adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 2009 vaccine (Pandemrix) in England, there seems to be an increased risk of narcolepsy, according to research published online Feb. 26 in BMJ.

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Home-Based Telehealth Not Effective for Chronic Conditions

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Second-generation, home-based telehealth is no more effective than usual care for quality of life and psychological outcomes among patients with chronic health conditions, according to research published online Feb. 26 in BMJ.

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Low-Intensity Interventions Beneficial in Severe Depression

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Low-intensity interventions are beneficial even for severe depression, with evidence of an interaction between depression severity and treatment effect, according to a meta-analysis published online Feb. 26 in BMJ.

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ACR Releases Five 'Don'ts' for Rheumatologists

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- As part of the Choosing Wisely campaign, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has issued a list of the top five tests and treatments commonly misordered by rheumatologists; the list has been published in the March issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Obesity, Physical Activity Linked to Risk in Subset of Colorectal CA

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity and physical inactivity are associated with a higher risk of WNT/β-catenin (CTNNB1)-negative colorectal cancer, but are not associated with CTNNB1-positive cancer risk, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in Cancer Research.

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Intern Performance No Better With Simulation-Based Training

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A single simulation-based medical education (SBME) training session is not sufficient to improve interns' clinical procedural performance in infant lumbar puncture (ILP) and child intravenous line placement (CIV), according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Advanced Breast CA Incidence Up for U.S. 25- to 39-Year-Olds

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S. women aged 25 to 39 years, the incidence of breast cancer with distant involvement has increased since 1976, according to research published in the Feb. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AAFP Issues Top Five Choosing Wisely Recommendations

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The top five primary care issues that patients and physicians should question have been released by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) as part of the Choosing Wisely Campaign.

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FDA: Omontys Injection Pulled From Market

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Affymax Inc. of Palo Alto, Calif., and Takeda Pharmaceuticals Company Limited of Deerfield, Ill., have voluntarily recalled all lots of Omontys Injection, used to treat anemia in adult dialysis patients, following reports of serious and fatal hypersensitivity reactions, according to a safety recall issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Cardiologists Often Fail to Communicate Impact of ICDs

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- When communicating with patients about implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), cardiologists often misrepresent and omit information about the associated psychological and long-term risks, according to research published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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List of Five Unnecessary Vascular Tests Released

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The Society for Vascular Medicine (SVM) has published "Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question" in vascular medicine, a list of five tests and procedures that are commonly used but can be unnecessary or even harmful.

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Diagnostic Errors ID'd in Variety of Common Diseases

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnostic errors are seen in a variety of common conditions and most often relate to process breakdowns in patient-practitioner clinical encounters, according to research published online Feb. 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Sleep Restriction Impacts Gene Regulation

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Insufficient sleep affects gene regulation, including genes associated with circadian rhythms, sleep homeostasis, oxidative stress, and metabolism, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Preparation Underway for Implementation of ACA in 2014

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- As the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) nears, states are preparing for some of its provisions, including expanded access to Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and the use of information technology, according to a report issued by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Families Prefer ICU Doctors in Traditional White Coats, Scrubs

TUESDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive care unit (ICU) physician attire may influence patient family perceptions, according to a research letter published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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USPSTF: Vitamin D, Calcium Supplements Don't Prevent Fx

MONDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- For non-institutionalized postmenopausal women, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against daily supplementation with ≤400 IU of vitamin D3 and ≤1,000 mg of calcium for primary prevention of fractures, and a lack of evidence impairs the provision of recommendations for other populations, according to a statement published online Feb. 26 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Costs Up With Failure to Thrive Planned Weekend Admissions

MONDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Scheduled failure to thrive (FTT) admissions on weekends are associated with increased length of stay (LOS) and health care costs compared with admissions of similar complexity on weekdays, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Low-Dose CT Screening Could Avert ~12,000 Lung CA Deaths

MONDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening regimens, as outlined in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), could potentially prevent more than 12,000 lung cancer deaths in the United States each year, according to research published online Feb. 25 in Cancer.

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Infant Mortality Risk Increases With Maternal Alcohol Use

MONDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal alcohol-use disorder increases the risk of both sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and non-SIDS-related infant mortality, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

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AAP Updates Guidelines for Acute Otitis Media

MONDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its guidelines for the management of acute otitis media (AOM); the updated clinical practice guideline has been published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Insufficient Evidence to Support BP Screening for Children

MONDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force notes that there is insufficient evidence to indicate that hypertension screening in children and adolescents reduces adverse cardiovascular outcomes in adults. This Recommendation Statement is based on an evidence review published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Bariatric Surgery Does Not Appear to Cut Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery does not appear to reduce health care costs over a six-year period, according to an analysis published online Feb. 20 in JAMA Surgery.

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Transitional Care Payment Policy Can Help Bolster Primary Care

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have adopted a transitional care payment policy that will increase payment for primary care services and allow further increases if services are delivered efficiently (e.g., using the medical home model), according to a perspective piece published in the Feb. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Patients With Lower Incomes Less Likely to Die at Home

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with limited financial resources are less likely to die at home, according to research published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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CDC: 1.5 Million New Cancers Diagnosed Annually

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In 2009, approximately 1.5 million new cases of cancer were diagnosed in the United States, with an annual incidence rate of 459 cases per 100,000 population, according to research published in the Feb. 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC: 2012-2013 Flu Vaccine Not As Effective in Elderly

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination against influenza for the 2012/2013 flu season appears to be moderately effective in reducing the need for outpatient medical attention, but the effect is lower in the elderly, according to research published in the Feb. 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Fast Food Accounts for >11 Percent of Daily Calories in U.S.

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- More than 11 percent of adults' daily calorie consumption comes from fast foods, according to a February data brief issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Hands-On Cooking Education Aids Docs' Nutrition Knowledge

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Continuing education that includes didactic and hands-on cooking sessions improves physicians' self-reported nutrition-related behaviors, according to a research letter published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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No Lasting Survival Benefit With BRCA in Ovarian Cancer

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although patients with invasive ovarian cancer carrying BRCA1/2 mutations have a short-term survival advantage compared with noncarriers, the advantage is short-lived and is no longer observed at 10 years post-diagnosis, according to a study published in the Jan. 16 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Early Life Lung Function Tied to Persistent Wheezing to Age 18

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent wheezing from ages 6 years to 18 years correlates with multiple factors, including reduced infant lung function, infant-onset atopy, maternal asthma, and active smoking, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Study Examines Botox Dose Disparity in Aesthetic Face Tx

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing onabotulinum toxin A injections, the difference in doses given to achieve desired results in the muscles of the upper and lower face results from variable amounts of paralysis needed to achieve the desired aesthetic effects, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Benefits Expanded

FRIDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In a final rule, which will make purchasing health coverage easier for consumers, mental health and substance use benefits will be expanded to 62 million Americans, according to a report published Feb. 20 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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CDC: Children's Caloric Intake Decreased in Last Decade

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Over the last decade, caloric intake has fallen for most age groups among children and adolescents in the United States, according to a February data brief issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). In addition, protein intake has generally increased and carbohydrate intake has generally decreased.

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CMS Proposes Payment and Policy Updates for 2014

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Payment and policy updates have been proposed for 2014, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Advanced Notice and draft Call Letter published Feb. 15.

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AAP Issues Guidelines for Genetic Testing for Children

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Use of genetic testing and screening for children should be guided by their best interests and offered in the context of genetic counseling, according to an American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement published online Feb. 21 in Pediatrics.

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FDA: Codeine After Surgery Puts Children At Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Even when given in recommended amounts, codeine can be dangerous, perhaps deadly, in children, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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ACA Improves EMTALA Health Care Access Mandate Somewhat

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Although the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) goes some way to ensuring wider health care access, the system is still incomplete, according to a viewpoint published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Air Pollution Ups Mortality Rate Post-ACS Hospitalization

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), exposure to higher levels of air pollution, specifically particulate matter with a diameter of ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5), correlates with increased all-cause mortality, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in the European Heart Journal.

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Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Teens Linked to Early Death

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking, central obesity, and poor glycemic control in teens and young adults correlate with an increased risk of premature death, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Higher Risk of Hip Implant Failure for Women Than Men

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- After adjustment, implant failure is more likely for women than men who undergo total hip arthroplasty (THA), according to a study published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Report Discusses Impact of ACGME 2011 Requirements

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Although many residency program directors approve of individual components within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Common Program Requirements introduced in 2011, less than half express overall approval, according to a perspective piece published in the Feb. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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IV Hydroxyethyl Starch Not OK in Critically Ill Patients

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Due to significant safety concerns, hydroxyethyl starch should not be used for acute volume resuscitation in critically ill patients, according to research published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Extended Dabigatran Effective for Venous Thromboembolism

THURSDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with venous thromboembolism, extended treatment with dabigatran is noninferior to warfarin, according to a study published in the Feb. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Antioxidant Capacity of Diet Not Tied to Dementia, Stroke Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, the total antioxidant capacity of their diet does not affect the risk of dementia or stroke, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in Neurology.

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Magnetic Device Beneficial for Gastroesophageal Reflux

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors, a device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter improves reflux symptoms, reduces use of proton-pump inhibitors, and improves quality of life, according to a study published in the Feb. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Considerable Proportion of HBV/HCV Cases Go Unreported

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Reporting of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections is improving, but is still incomplete, according to research published in the Feb. 15 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Pros, Cons of Medical Marijuana for Metastatic Cancer Explored

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Some physicians favor while others advocate against the use of medical marijuana, according to a case vignette published online Feb. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Faster Adoption of Electronic Health Records Needed

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by health providers for Medicare is increasing, but not quickly enough to avoid penalties in 2015, according to a letter published in the Feb. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Anti-Müllerian Hormone Levels Can Predict IVF Success

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A woman's plasma level of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), produced in the ovaries, is strongly associated with the rate of live birth after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and may serve as a prognostic factor for the chance of pregnancy and live birth, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Opioids Involved in Most Medical Overdose Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid analgesics are involved in the majority of pharmaceutical-related overdose deaths, frequently involving drugs prescribed for mental health conditions, according to a research letter published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Women's Awareness of Heart Disease Improving

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past 15 years there has been an improvement in women's awareness of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but racial disparity still exists, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Circulation.

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Synthetic Marijuana Linked to Acute Kidney Injury

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Synthetic cannabinoids, sold under labels such as "synthetic marijuana," "herbal incense," "potpourri," and "spice" have been tied to hospitalizations for unexplained acute kidney injury (AKI) in the United States, according to research published in the Feb. 15 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Reimbursement Policies for Out-of-Hospital Care Flawed

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Current Medicare reimbursement costs for out-of-hospital care, which link payment with transport to an emergency department, should be modified to improve patient-centered care and reduce costs, according to a viewpoint published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prognostic Value of CCTA Explored for Suspected CAD

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) without modifiable risk factors, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is an effective tool for determining the risk of heart attacks and other adverse cardiac events, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Radiology.

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Redefinition of Positive CT Result for Lung Cancer Explored

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing the threshold for defining a positive result in computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer could reduce the need for further work-up but must be weighed against the potential for delayed diagnosis, according to a study published in the Feb. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Birth Order May Affect Metabolic, Cardiac Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Birth order may influence metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factors, including insulin sensitivity and daytime blood pressure, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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CMS: Unnecessary Medicare Regulations to Be Reformed

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare regulations which are unnecessary, obsolete, or excessively burdensome on hospital or health care providers will be reformed, according to a rule proposed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in response to the President's instructions in Executive Order 13563.

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Multimodality Approach Needed to Reengineer Health Care

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A multimodality approach focusing on reengineering the U.S. health care system may provide a way to improve quality and reduce costs, according to a viewpoint published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sleep Duration Linked to Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) is modestly higher for male physicians who sleep eight hours or more per night, while shorter sleep duration (six hours or less) is associated with a higher risk of AF in those with sleep apnea, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Online Bullying Just As Harmful for Children As Offline

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- School children who are the victims of bullying via Internet or mobile phone are just as likely to skip school or consider suicide as those who are physically bullied, according to research published online Feb. 7 in the International Criminal Justice Review.

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Program Cuts Unnecessary Referrals for Scoliosis in Teens

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a quality improvement program correlates with a sustained reduction in unnecessary referrals for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Most Moms Stop Breastfeeding Earlier Than They Desire

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Concerns about maternal or child health and lactation or milk-pumping problems are the major reasons why mothers stop breastfeeding earlier than desired, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Depression Affects Efficacy of Herpes Zoster Vaccine

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Depressed elderly patients display a diminished varicella zoster virus (VZV)-specific immune response after vaccination with the herpes zoster vaccine compared with non-depressed patients, but antidepressant medication helps to normalize this response, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Acupuncture May Help Treat Seasonal Allergies

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture produces statistically significant improvements in disease-specific quality of life and reduces antihistamine use in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR), although further study is required to determine whether these results are clinically significant, according to a study published online in the Feb. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Patient Care

TUESDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Use of an artificial intelligence (AI) framework can improve patient outcomes at one-third of the costs of the current standard of care, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in Artificial Intelligence in Medicine.

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Vitamin D Dosing Should Be Same in Black, White Women

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Black and white women respond similarly to vitamin D supplements and should be dosed similarly, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Racial Disparities Observed in Opioid Monitoring

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For patients receiving opioids for non-cancer pain, racial disparities exist in opioid monitoring and follow-up treatment practices, according to a study published in the January issue of Pain.

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CDC: Cephalosporin-Resistant Gonorrhea Imminent in U.S.

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed antimicrobial resistance since the 1930s and may be developing resistance to cephalosporins, according to research published in the Feb. 15 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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USPSTF Reviews Therapies for Open-Angle Glaucoma

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has reviewed the comparative evidence of medical, laser, and surgical treatments to inform their recommendations on screening for open-angle glaucoma. This Recommendation Statement is based on an evidence review published in the Feb. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Draft Recommendation Statement
Comment on Recommendations
Background Review

Watching More TV As Child Tied to Adult Antisocial Behavior

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adolescents who watch more television have an increased likelihood of antisocial behavior in early adulthood; and, the content of television impacts behavior in preschool-aged children, according to two studies published online Feb. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Vicarious Abusive Supervision at Work Has Negative Impact

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand, or vicarious, abusive supervision at work can have significant impacts on worker frustration with their job, coworker abuse, and perceived organizational support, especially when combined with firsthand abusive supervision, according to research published in the January/February issue of the Journal of Social Psychology.

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Therapy-Related Leukemia Risk Varied From 1975 to 2008

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Since the 1970s, the risk of developing therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (tAML) after chemotherapy has varied over time, depending on the initial cancer type and treatment practices, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in Blood.

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Neonatal Bisphenol A Levels Linked to Medical Device Use

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The levels of bisphenol A (BPA) in the urine of premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit is associated with greater exposure to medical devices, but not with nutritional intake, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Parity Does Reduce Families' Mental Health Expenditures

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For families with children with mental health and substance use disorders (MH/SUDs), parity laws decrease the share and level of out-of-pocket (OOP) expenses, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Celiac Disease Down for Swedish Youth Born in 1997 Versus 1993

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Swedish 12-year-olds born in 1997 have a significantly reduced prevalence of celiac disease, compared with those born in 1993, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Race Affects Physical Activity Levels in Knee Osteoarthritis

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In persons with or at risk for radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA), African-Americans are 72 to 76 percent less likely than whites to meet the 2008 United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Physical Activity Guidelines aerobic component, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Mycobacterial Infection Seen After Laser Resurfacing

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection can occur after fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing, according to a case series published in the March issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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AMA Issues Code for Safe Care Transitions After Hospital Stay

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A series of five responsibilities and five principles should guide ambulatory practices to achieve safe and effective care transitions for patients after hospital stays, according to a report issued by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Two-Step Irradiance OK for Superficial Skin Cancer Lesions

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A two-step irradiance protocol with topical δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) minimizes pain while maintaining comparable clinical outcomes for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer lesions, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Ozone Levels, PM2.5 Linked to Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- There is an increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with higher levels of exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Circulation.

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A1C, Blood Pressure, LDL Goals Improving in Diabetes

FRIDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Although there have been improvements in achieving hemoglobin A1c (A1C), blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (ABC) goals, control is still suboptimal for many, including minorities, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in Diabetes Care.

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Video Capsule Accurately Detects Intestinal Blood

FRIDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Video capsule endoscopy can be safely and accurately used to detect blood in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage seen in emergency departments, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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