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March 2013 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: April 01, 2013.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for March 2013. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Reassortment of Flu Viruses Most Likely in China, Nile Delta

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- The potential for reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses underscores that emerging diseases arise at the convergence of the human and animal domains, according to a study published in the April issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Multiple Strategies Are More Efficient for Cervical Cancer

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple cervical cancer screening strategies that maximize early detection of high-grade disease without excessive increases in initial testing appear to be most effective, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Sex, Age at Presentation Affect Cirrhosis Response to Therapy

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), sex and age at presentation affect the response to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), according to a study published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

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Hormone Therapy Ups Breast Cancer Risk, Mortality

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal hormone therapy with estrogen plus progestin is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online March 29 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Computer-Based Programs Show Benefits for Diabetes

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Computer-based diabetes self-management interventions have a small beneficial effect on blood glucose control, according to a review published online March 28 in The Cochrane Library.

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Genetic Profiles Linked to Progression to Heavy Smoking

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with genetic profiles putting them at risk of greater smoking are more likely to progress to heavy smoking and nicotine dependence, particularly if they quickly became daily smokers and heavy smokers as adolescents, according to a study published online March 27 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Higher Activity Levels May Protect Children From Stress

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Children with lower levels of daytime physical activity (PA) have higher hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA) activity in response to psychosocial stress, suggesting that PA may help children cope with stressful situations, according to research published online March 7 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Many Uninsured Vets Will Be Eligible for Medicaid Under ACA

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- A large proportion of uninsured veterans and their spouses will be eligible for Medicaid or new subsidies for coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), according to a report published by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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Greater Vaccine Exposure Not Tied to Increased Autism Risk

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Increased exposure to vaccines during the first two years of life is not associated with an increased risk of autism, according to a study published online March 29 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Gastric Bypass Leads to Gut Microbiota Changes in Mice

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Mice that undergo gastric bypass surgery have changes in their gut composition independent of weight loss, and transferring the gut microbiota to germ-free mice results in weight loss without sugery, according to a study published in the March 27 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Metabolite-Based Test May Detect Early Pancreatic Cancer

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- A test that measures four serum metabolites can accurately distinguish patients with pancreatic cancer from healthy people and patients with pancreatitis, according to a study published online March 29 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Study Examines Physician Prescription of Teen IUDs

FRIDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians are more or less likely to prescribe long-acting reversible contraception such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) to adolescents based on their knowledge, skills, clinical environment, and attitudes, according to research published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Low Vitamin D Levels Common Among Spinal Fusion Patients

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- A substantially high number of patients undergoing spinal fusion have a vitamin D deficiency or inadequacy, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of Spine.

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Viral DNA-Based Testing Can Triage Women With Abnormal Pap

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- DNA-based testing with Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) assay is more accurate than repeat cytology in identifying women with cervical cancer when their initial Pap smear shows atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), according to research published online March 28 in The Cochrane Library.

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Pre-College Talk With Parents Reduces Student Drinking

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Parents talking to their matriculating college-age students about drinking lessens alcohol consumption, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

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Higher Fiber Intake Tied to Lower Risk of First Stroke

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Higher fiber intake is associated with a lower risk of first stroke, according to a meta-analysis published online March 28 in Stroke.

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Regional Variation Noted in Prevalence of Delayed Care

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable county-wide variation in the prevalence of delayed care, with high prevalence linked to a weaker health care infrastructure, according to a letter published in the March 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Birth Weight, Early Linear Growth Rate Affect Later Health

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- In low- and middle-income countries, fast linear growth in the first two years of life is associated with increased adult height and completion of more schooling, while higher weight at birth and later in childhood is associated with increased risk of obesity, according to a study published online March 28 in The Lancet.

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Breath Test Ties Hydrogen, Methane to Higher BMI

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- There is a significant association between having both high methane and hydrogen results on a breath test and having a higher body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online March 26 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Academic Urology Training Program in Crisis

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- The current system of Graduate Medical Education (GME) funding is not adequate in funding urology residency programs and may lead to a significant shortage of urologists in the United States, according to research published in the March issue of Urology.

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H. pylori Status May Affect Recurrent Ulcer Bleeding

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding is low in long-term low-dose aspirin (ASA) users with a history of ulcer bleeding and eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), but high in ASA users with a history of ulcer bleeding and negative for H. pylori, according to research published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

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Study: Primary Care Extension Program Should Be Funded

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- The Primary Care Extension Program (PCEP) has the potential to transform primary care and needs to be funded, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Cell-Cycle Progression Panel Identifies Prostate Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- The cell-cycle progression (CCP) gene panel is useful to improve the risk stratification for men with even low-risk, clinically localized prostate cancer, according to research published online March 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Using Internet Search Logs Can Help Identify Drug Interactions

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Search logs can be used to inexpensively mine for anonymized signals that may alert authorities to potential drug interactions and add new Web-scale pharmacovigilance capabilities, according to research published online March 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

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Texts Do Not Promote Flu Vaccination During Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Text messages encouraging pregnant women to get an influenza vaccination are ineffective, according to a study published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology. A related study in the same journal examines factors predicting influenza vaccination among pregnant women.

Abstract - Henninger
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Abstract - Moniz
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Genetic Variant Boosts Asthma Risk in Children With HRV

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- The 17q21 genotype increases the risk of asthma in children who have had human rhinovirus (HRV) wheezing illness, according to a study published online March 27 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Trial Shows Miravirsen Decreases HCV RNA Levels

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Subcutaneous injections of miravirsen, an miRNA inhibitor, result in significant virologic responses in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to a study published online March 27 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Management of Short Stature in Childhood Discussed

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Short stature in childhood warrants evaluation, and various treatment options should be considered, according to a case vignette published in the March 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Inpatient Deaths Fell by 8 Percent in Last Decade

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- The number of inpatient hospital deaths declined by 8 percent over the last decade, although the total number of hospitalizations increased by 11 percent during the same period, according to a March data brief issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Psoriasis Tied to Increased Risk of New-Onset Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Psoriasis is significantly tied to an increased risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM), according to a study published online March 14 in Diabetes Care.

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Submitting Peer-Review Reports Could Expedite Process

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Attaching previous peer-review reports during the next submission of the same paper to a different journal could optimize the peer-review process, according to research published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Novel Approach Found for Treating Hypertrophic Scars

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Same-session therapy with fractional ablative laser treatment followed immediately with topical application of triamcinolone acetonide suspension is effective in treating patients with hypertrophic and restrictive cutaneous scars, according to research published in the March issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Daylight Savings Time Modestly Affects AMI Type, Incidence

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Transition to and from daylight savings time (DST) might modestly affect the incidence and type of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to research published in the March issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Weight Loss, Muscle Depletion May Predict Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients with high weight loss, low muscle index, and low muscle attenuation have a poor prognosis regardless of body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online March 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Smoking Has Gender-Specific Effect in Urothelial Carcinoma

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) treated with radical nephroureterectomy (RNU), the impact of smoking is gender specific, with worse outcomes for females than for males, according to a study published online March 6 in BJU International.

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MRI Detects Cortical Brain Abnormalities for Migraines

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with migraines have cortical thickness and surface area abnormalities that may represent both a predisposition to the condition as well as disease-related processes, according to a study published online March 26 in Radiology.

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Mild Impairment at Diagnosis of Parkinson's Ups Dementia Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at the time of a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) predicts a highly increased risk for early dementia, according to a study published online March 25 in JAMA Neurology.

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Majority of Lumbar Spine MRIs Are Inappropriately Ordered

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- There is substantial overuse of lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, according to a research letter published online March 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Early Baldness Ups Prostate CA Risk for African-Americans

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- For African-Americans, who are at elevated prostate cancer risk, baldness at age 30 correlates with prostate cancer, with frontal baldness linked to increased odds of high-stage and high-grade disease, according to a study published online March 26 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Chelation Therapy Effectiveness Is Limited After Heart Attack

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Chelation therapy only results in a small reduction of the risk of a cardiovascular event following a myocardial infarction (MI) and should not be used in routine clinical care, according to a study published in the March 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Macrolide Antibiotics Are Effective for Bronchiectasis

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Macrolide antibiotics are effective in reducing exacerbations in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, although the resistance rate increases, according to two studies published in the March 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Altenburg
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Certified Primary Stroke Centers Use More Rt-PA

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Joint Commission certified primary stroke centers (PSCs) use more recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) for ischemic stroke than non-PSCs, according to a study published online March 26 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Sublingual Immunotherapy Effective for Allergies

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Current studies show moderate evidence that sublingual immunotherapy is effective for allergic rhinitis, although the optimal dosing is unclear, according to a review published in the March 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Supplement Aids Age-Related Macular Degeneration

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- A supplement containing a combination of lutein, zeaxanthin, and ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) significantly benefits patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a study published online March 21 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Residency Reforms Reduced Duty Hours, Increased Sleep

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Additional residency reforms implemented in 2011 have reduced duty hours and increased sleep duration, but with perceived reductions in quality of patient care, according to research published online March 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Sen
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Social Isolation, Apart From Loneliness, Can Harm Health

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Both loneliness and social isolation are associated with mortality, with the link for social isolation independent of demographics, baseline health, and loneliness, according to a study published online March 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Risk of Prostate Cancer Quantified for Lynch Syndrome

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Lynch syndrome carriers have about a two-fold increased risk of prostate cancer, according to a study published online March 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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MRSA Colonization in Groin Tied to Clinical Infections

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Groin colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) leads to an increased risk of developing active MRSA infection later among HIV-infected patients, according to a study published in the April issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Sleep Duration Affects Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes with either a short or long sleep duration have significantly higher hemoglobin A1c (A1C) levels compared to patients with intermediate sleep duration, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

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One in 10 Parents Often Don't Follow Pediatricians' Advice

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Although the majority of parents follow the advice of their child's health care provider most or all of the time, a considerable percentage of parents only occasionally follow their advice, according to a report published March 18 by the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital.

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Age of Menarche, Menopause Linked to Cardiovascular Risk

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- For Chinese women, the age of menarche and menopause is not related to the risk of diabetes, but does correlate with cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis, according to a study published online March 7 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Unintended Harmful Effects of Mammography Studied

TUESDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- A false-positive test result from screening mammography is not harmless and can result in negative long-term psychosocial consequences, according to research published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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HCV Transmission Risk Is Low in Monogamous Couples

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Monogamous heterosexual couples where one partner is infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at very low risk of transmitting the virus to the uninfected partner, according to a study in the March issue of Hepatology. A related study in the same journal found that the prevalence of HCV infection among newly incarcerated inmates is about 1 percent.

Abstract - Kim
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Abstract - Terrault
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Exposure to Common Germs Linked to Worse Cognition

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Infectious burden, a composite serologic measure of exposure to common pathogens, is associated with worse cognition, according to a study published in the March 26 issue of Neurology.

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Exhaled Breath Can ID Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- An exhaled breath metabolome is feasible for identifying acute decompensated heart failure, according to a research letter published in the April 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Even the Poorest Handheld Umbrellas Can Block UV Rays

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Handheld umbrellas are effective at blocking ultraviolet radiation (UVR), according to a study published online March 20 in JAMA Dermatology.

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FDA Approves Inhaler for Cystic Fibrosis Patients

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- The TOBI Podhaler (tobramycin inhalation powder) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat cystic fibrosis patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that can damage the lungs.

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Attentive Eating Influences Food Intake

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Being more aware while eating may lower food consumption, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Peds to Adult Diabetes Care Switch Mars Glycemic Control

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- For youth with type 1 diabetes, the transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care is associated with increased risk of poor glycemic control, according to a study published online March 25 in Pediatrics.

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White Matter Diffusivity Linked to Gulf War Illness Symptoms

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Fatigue, pain, and hyperalgesia are associated with increased axial diffusivity in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus in veterans with Gulf War Illness, according to a study published online March 20 in PLOS ONE.

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Nurses Can Resolve Low Complexity, Primary Care Cases

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses can comparably solve acute, low complexity health problems with similar results to general practitioners, according to a study published online March 21 in the Journal of Advanced Nursing.

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Maternal Grief Linked to Baby's Congenital Heart Disease Risk

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children born to mothers who lost a close relative around the time of conception have a slightly higher risk of congenital heart disease, according to a study published online March 25 in Pediatrics.

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Many Mothers Introducing Solid Foods to Infants Too Early

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- About 40 percent of mothers introduce solid food to their infants before the recommended four months of age, with an even higher prevalence for formula-fed infants, according to a study published online March 25 in Pediatrics.

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High Mortality, Morbidity With Early-Onset Scoliosis Surgery

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery for patients with early-onset scoliosis is associated with an 18 percent mortality rate and an 84 percent complication rate, according to research published in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

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Antiplatelet Drugs Don't Up ICH Risk in New Study

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Pre-existing antiplatelet use does not seem to be associated with an increased risk of ischemic hemorrhage (ICH), according to an observational study published in the February issue of Academic Emergency Medicine.

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Reading, Writing, Ranting Online Could Be a Web of Rage

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Reading and writing on rant websites seems to be an unhealthy practice, according to a study published Feb. 20 in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

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Survey Finds Illegal Firearm Purchases, Thefts Are Common

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Licensed firearms retailers report attempts to illegally purchase or steal firearms are common, according to research published online March 11 in Injury Prevention.

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Higher Mortality Rate Seen in Middle-Aged Diabetes Patients

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes, particularly women and those under the age of 55, have a two to three times higher risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality than people without diabetes, according to research published online Feb. 22 in Diabetes Care.

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Sports Concussion Management Recommendations Updated

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations for sports concussion and its management have been updated, according to a consensus statement published in the April issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Field Stories Can Shape Public Policy for Obesity Prevention

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Stories from the field can help highlight policy, systems, and environmental approaches effective in obesity prevention, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Better Long-Term Outcomes With Low Hep C Viral Load

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), low HCV viral load predicts better long-term surgical outcomes, regardless of the serologic eradication of HCV, according to research published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Mobility Impaired May Have Difficulty Accessing Docs

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. subspecialty practices cannot accommodate patients with mobility impairment, according to a study published in the March 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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No Overall Survival Benefit Tied to Bilateral Oophorectomy

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- At no age is there an overall survival benefit associated with bilateral oophorectomy compared with ovarian conservation at the time of hysterectomy for benign disease, according to a study published online March 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Engineered Immune Cells Lead to Leukemia Remission

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Five patients with relapsed B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) quickly achieved complete remission after treatment with autologous engineered T cells, according to research published in the March 20 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Clarithromycin May Be Linked to Cardiovascular Events

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or community-acquired pneumonia, use of clarithromycin correlates with increased risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study published online March 22 in BMJ.

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Telehealth in Addition to Usual Care Not Cost-Effective

FRIDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with chronic health conditions, a telehealth intervention in addition to standard support and treatment is associated with increased costs, with no significant benefit in terms of quality adjusted life years (QALYs), according to a study published online March 22 in BMJ.

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Impact of Budget Sequestration on Health Care Discussed

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- The impact of sequestration will have far-reaching consequences in health care, according to a perspective piece published online March 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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FDA Approves Dotarem for Nervous System MRIs

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Dotarem (gadoterate meglumine) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a contrast agent for use in MRIs of the brain, spine, and other parts of the central nervous system.

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Most People With Prediabetes in the Dark About Their Condition

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Most of the people in the United States with prediabetes, a state that puts them at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes if they do not take measures to prevent that progression, are unaware of their condition, according to research published in the March 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Hypertension, APOE Genotype Add to Amyloid Deposits

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Hypertension in combination with the apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype increases amyloid deposits in cognitively healthy middle-aged and older adults, according to a study published online March 18 in JAMA Neurology.

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Race Influences Lower Extremity Ischemia Treatment

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Even after adjustment for confounding variables, black patients are significantly more likely to undergo amputation for critical lower extremity ischemia, according to a study published online March 20 in JAMA Surgery.

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Suicide Ideation, Attempts Higher in Children With Autism

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism have much higher rates of suicide ideation and suicide attempts than typical children, according to a study published in the January issue of Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

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Hypospadias Not Related to Organic Diet During Pregnancy

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Although no obvious relationship between organic diet during pregnancy and hypospadias has been found, frequent consumption of non-organic high-fat dairy products during pregnancy might be associated with increased odds of hypospadias, according to research published in the March issue of Urology.

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Endocrine Society Urges Better Standards for Estradiol Testing

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- A new position statement published by The Endocrine Society recommends that estradiol measurement assays and reference ranges be standardized and that the health care community work toward improving the accessibility of accurate estradiol testing methods; the position statement was published online March 5 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Can Also Reduce Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Subjects who are enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study and are meeting goals for six to seven ideal health metrics have a 51 percent lower risk of incident cancer than those not meeting any goals for ideal health metrics, according to research published online March 18 in Circulation.

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Annual BP Checks May Improve Hypertension Identification

THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- For previously normotensive adults, an annual office-based hypertension screening strategy is associated with improved specificity while maintaining sensitivity, according to a study published in the March/April issue of Annals of Family Medicine.

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Pediatric Malaria Vaccine Efficacy Declines With Time

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- A pediatric malaria vaccine reduces episodes of clinical malaria but its efficacy declines over time, according to a study in the March 21 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

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Effect of Immigration Status on Medicaid Eligibility Discussed

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Under the Affordable Care Act, a considerable proportion of low-income uninsured adults will be ineligible for Medicaid coverage due to their immigration status, and their main providers are likely to be safety-net health care providers, according to a March report published by the State Health Access Data Assistance Center.

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Childrens' Norovirus-Related Gastroenteritis Still a Burden

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Norovirus-associated illness is the leading cause of medically attended acute gastroenteritis in young children, according to a study published in the March 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Closure of Patent Foramen Ovale Doesn't Beat Medical Tx

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with patent foramen ovale, percutaneous closure is not superior to medical therapy for the risk of recurrent embolic events or death, or for reducing recurrent ischemic stroke, according to two studies published in the March 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Meier
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Intensive Glycemic Control Linked to Highest Weight Gains

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Weight gain is higher in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who receive more intensive glycemic control treatment and is associated with a reduction of A1C from baseline, according to research published online Feb. 14 in Diabetes Care.

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High-Potency Statins Up Acute Kidney Injury Hospitalizations

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with non-chronic kidney disease, high-potency statin treatment is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for acute kidney injury, according to a study published online March 19 in the BMJ.

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Prevalence of Parent-Reported Autism Up in School Children

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of parent-reported autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in school-aged children appears to have increased, but that may be due to new diagnoses in children whose ASD had previously gone unrecognized, according to research published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's March 20 National Health Statistics Reports.

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HIV Prevalence Is High Among High-Risk Heterosexuals

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of HIV infection is high among low socioeconomic heterosexuals living in areas with high rates of AIDS in 2010, according to research published in the March 15 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Ethics of Peds Countermeasure Research Discussed

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric research on medical countermeasures should present no more than minimal risk to participants, and should follow a specific framework if there is a minor increase over minimal risk, according to a perspective piece published online March 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Chlorthalidone No Better Than Hydrochlorothiazide for HTN

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with hypertension, chlorthalidone is not associated with fewer adverse cardiovascular events or death, but correlates with increased hypokalemia compared with hydrochlorothiazide, according to a study published in the March 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Molluscum Contagiosum Virus Linked to Pubic Hair Removal

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of sexually transmitted molluscum contagiosum virus (STMC) may be linked to hair removal in the genital area, according to a letter published online March 18 in Sexually Transmitted Infections.

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Manual Osteopathic Treatment Improves Chronic Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of nonspecific chronic low back pain with osteopathic manual treatment (OMT) is associated with moderate or substantial improvements in low back pain, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Docs Decide on Duration of Antibiotics in Long-Term Care

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Prescriber preference rather than patient characteristics influences the duration of antibiotic courses in long-term care residents, according to research published online March 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Total Knee Replacement Poses Large Public Health Burden

WEDNESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) --The prevalence of total knee replacement is estimated at 4.2 percent for U.S. adul


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