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American Academy of Pediatrics, Oct. 26-29

Last Updated: November 01, 2013.

The American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition

The annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) was held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla., and attracted more than 12,000 participants from around the world, including primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical sub-specialists, pediatric surgical specialists, and other health care professionals. The conference featured scientific sessions that focused on the latest advances in the care of infants, children, adolescents and young adults as well as scientific papers, posters, and education exhibits.

In one clinical report, Mark Halstead, M.D., of Washington University in St. Louis, and colleagues offered pediatricians, and those who care for pediatric patients, some guidance on the issues related to returning to school and learning following a concussion and some strategies to help the students during their recovery.

While some children and adolescents may be able to return to the classroom shortly after a concussion, others with more severe or prolonged symptoms may require additional home care and/or modifications to their academic environment. The use of a symptom checklist is recommended to assess the severity of the concussion and implications on learning.

"We hope that this will serve as a framework to help guide the care of these young patients and help maximize their recovery potential in a timely fashion," said Halstead. "We also recognize that this topic is an area ripe for research to determine which methods may help students the best and help in their recovery."

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In another study, Matthew C. Wylie, M.D., of Boston Children's Hospital, and colleagues found that brain injury and concussion were associated with depression in the U.S. pediatric population.

"The prevalence of brain injury in the U.S. pediatric population is approximately 2 percent, and depression is 3.7 percent. However, in pediatric patients with brain injury or concussion, the prevalence of depression is 15 percent. After correcting for known predictors of depression in children, odds of depression in brain-injured children are still twice as high," said Wylie. "Pediatricians and parents should be aware of this association to screen for this treatable condition if it arises."

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Robert Arnold, M.D., of Burma Vision in Anchorage, Alaska, compared four recent photoscreeners in his pediatric eye practice, including on children with developmental delays, who are considered very difficult to screen with conventional acuity screening.

"All four devices worked very well on children, including those who usually cannot perform an acuity screening -- the very young and the developmentally delayed," said Arnold. "Pediatricians now have a procedure code for photoscreening [CPT code 99174] and an AAP position paper encouraging photoscreening; we are confident insurers will soon reimburse well for this sight saving, quick technology."

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Neeru Jayanthi, M.D., of Loyola Medicine in Maywood, Ill., and colleagues found that athletes who spent more time focusing on one sport were more likely to have been injured. The investigators found that this was true even after they adjusted the data to account for age and more hours engaged in activity per week.

"Children who spent more hours per week than their age engaged in physical activity were also more likely to be injured, according to the study. That means if your child is 10, he or she shouldn't participate in more than 10 hours of physical activity weekly -- including both organized sports and free play," said Jayanthi. "Also, playing more than twice the number of weekly hours of organized sports than in free play also puts a child at risk for injury and serious overuse injury."

Jayanthi cautions young athletes about early, intensive year-round specialized training, particularly when their weekly hours exceed their age.

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AAP: Helmet Use Low in Kids' Involved in Bike Accidents

TUESDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Just over 10 percent of children involved in bicycle-related accidents are wearing helmets at the time, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla.

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AAP: Rise Seen in Pediatric MRSA Musculoskeletal Infections

TUESDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past decade, pediatric methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) musculoskeletal infections have increased in frequency, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla.

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AAP: Ingestion of 'Super' Magnets by Children Increasing

TUESDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The ingestion of "super" magnets by children has increased over the last decade, particularly in the last three years, according to a case series presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla.

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AAP: Helmet Brand Doesn't Impact Sport-Tied Concussion

TUESDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For high school football players, neither specific helmet brands nor custom mouth guards correlate with a reduction in sport-related concussions (SRCs), according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla.

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AAP: Pediatrician's Role in Managing Media Discussed

MONDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should take a media history from their patients and assess recreational screen time, according to a clinical report published online Oct. 28 in Pediatrics to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla.

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AAP: Epidemiology of Firearm Injuries Described in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- While one study defined the epidemiology of firearm injuries in children aged 14 years and younger, another study found that gun ownership correlates with gunshot wounds in the home; both studies were presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla.

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AAP: Advice Offered for Return to Learning Post-Concussion

MONDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical report published online Oct. 28 in Pediatrics, guidance is provided to better understand the issues related to returning to learning after a concussion. The guidelines were published to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla.

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AAP: Brain Injury Linked to Depression in Children

FRIDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children with brain injury are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, even after adjusting for multiple factors, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla.

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