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American College of Cardiology, March 29-31

Last Updated: April 02, 2014.

The American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session and Expo

The annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology was held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C., and attracted more than 20,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in cardiology. The conference highlighted recent advances in the treatment, management, and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Presentations focused on novel drugs and surgical approaches to improve the quality of care for patients with cardiovascular diseases.

In one study, Sourabh Aggarwal, M.D., of the Western Michigan University School of Medicine in Kalamazoo, and colleagues found that a statewide smoking ban benefited cardiovascular outcomes via decreased hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality.

Currently, according to Aggarwal, there is no nationwide federal policy banning indoor smoking, even though such a policy might improve public health and potentially reduce health care costs.

"Our study provides concrete evidence of clinical benefit of public policy and lays the foundation where an implementation of similar policy at federal level can be initiated, though further studies will be needed to determine long-term clinical and economic impact through decreased cost of hospitalization," said Aggarwal.

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In the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial, Deepak L. Bhatt, M.D., of Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues found that renal denervation failed to significantly decrease systolic blood pressure from baseline to six months as well as average 24-hour levels by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The investigators randomized 535 patients with resistant hypertension and systolic blood pressure of 160 mm Hg or higher to renal denervation or angiography alone.

"While we did not find a significant blood pressure reduction in our study, I still hope research in this area continues, as uncontrolled blood pressure remains an important clinical concern," said Bhatt.

One author disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical and medical device companies, including Medtronic, the manufacturer of the renal denervation system used in study.

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In the CoreValve U.S. Pivotal High Risk Trial, David H. Adams, M.D., of the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues found that survival at one year was superior in patients undergoing a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the CoreValve as compared to surgery. The study randomized 795 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis with increased risks for open heart surgery to TAVR with a CoreValve or surgical valve replacement.

"We found that CoreValve patients had a 26 percent survival advantage at one year compared to patients who underwent surgical valve replacement. The stroke rates were similar between the two groups," said Adams. "This is a new clinical evidence base from a large rigorously controlled randomized trial. This is the type of evidence considered in making recommendations for clinical practice by guideline committees."

One author disclosed a financial relationship with Medtronic, the manufacturer of the CoreValve, and Edwards Lifesciences.

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ACC: Celiac Disease May Up Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

TUESDAY, April 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with celiac disease have nearly a two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), compared with the general population, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Too Much Running Tied to Shorter Lifespan

TUESDAY, April 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There may a point of diminishing health returns with running, according to research findings presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Biodegradable Biolimus-Eluting Stent Found Noninferior

TUESDAY, April 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing drug-eluting stent implantation, biodegradable polymer biolimus-eluting stents (BP-BES) are noninferior to durable polymer everolimus-eluting stents (DP-EES) for death or myocardial infarction (MI), and for target lesion revascularization (TLR) at two-years, according to a study published online March 31 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. This research was published to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Evolocumab Significantly Lowers LDL Cholesterol

TUESDAY, April 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The monoclonal antibody evolocumab significantly reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, according to a phase 3 study published online March 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was published to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Diet Drink Consumption Tied to Higher CVD Risk

MONDAY, March 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between higher diet drink intake and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in postmenopausal women, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Statins Tied to Improvement in Erectile Function

MONDAY, March 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Statins cause a clinically relevant improvement of erectile function, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Aspirin, Clonidine Don't Affect Death, MI in Noncardiac Sx

MONDAY, March 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing noncardiac surgery at risk for vascular complications, administration of aspirin or clonidine has no significant effect on a composite of death or nonfatal myocardial infarction, according to two studies published online March 31 in the New England Journal of Medicine. This research was published to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Bariatric Surgery Offers Lasting Benefit in T2DM

MONDAY, March 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For obese patients with type 2 diabetes, long-term glycemic control is significantly better with bariatric surgery compared with medical therapy, according to a study published online March 31 in the New England Journal of Medicine. This research was published to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: 30 Percent of Preteens Have Elevated Cholesterol

MONDAY, March 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About 30 percent of 9- to 11-year-olds have abnormal total cholesterol levels, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Having More Babies Harms Moms' Cardiovascular Health

MONDAY, March 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have had four or more babies are at greater risk for subclinical atherosclerosis, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Married People Have Lower Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

FRIDAY, March 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Married people have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), compared to widowed or divorced people, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Spikes After Natural Disaster

FRIDAY, March 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Spikes in cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy ("broken heart syndrome") were seen in two states after major natural disasters hit in 2011, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Mediterranean Diet Adherence Cuts Diabetes Risk

THURSDAY, March 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a reduced risk of diabetes, according to a review presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Heart Rate Responses to Exercise Differ for Men, Women

THURSDAY, March 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Heart rate responses to exercise are different for men and women, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Coronary Artery Disease

THURSDAY, March 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D deficiency is associated with the prevalence and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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ACC: Seasonal Variation Identified in Lipid Levels

THURSDAY, March 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S. adults, there is seasonal variation in lipid levels, with values peaking in the winter, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 29 to 31 in Washington, D.C.

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