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April 2014 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: May 01, 2014.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for April 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA Considering OTC Use of Singulair for Allergies

WEDNESDAY, April 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Over-the-counter use of Singulair as a treatment for allergies is being considered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Health Highlights: April 30, 2014

Afternoon Exercise May Up Overnight/Next-Day Hypoglycemia

WEDNESDAY, April 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Afternoon moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) increases the risk of overnight and next-day hypoglycemia in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

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Nongroup Insurance Market Lacked Stability Before ACA

WEDNESDAY, April 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The nongroup insurance market has been characterized by frequent disruptions in coverage before implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), according to research published online April 23 in Health Affairs.

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High-Dose Antidepressants Tied to Increased Self-Harm

TUESDAY, April 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children and young adults taking high-dose antidepressants are at heightened risk of deliberate self-harm, compared to those taking modal-therapeutic doses, according to a study published online April 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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U.S. Children Experiencing Less Violence

TUESDAY, April 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer American children have been exposed to violent acts such as assault, bullying, sexual victimization, and emotional abuse since 2003, according to a study published online April 28 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Winter's Polar Vortex Ushers in Spring's 'Pollen Vortex'

TUESDAY, April 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Allergy experts say that the long, cold winter kept trees dormant for longer than usual, which means tree pollen season will overlap with grass pollen and mold seasons this year.

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Training Programs Protect Young Athletes From ACL Tears

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Certain training methods can greatly reduce young athletes' risk of serious and potentially debilitating knee injuries, a new report says. Overall, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery is about 90 percent successful in restoring knee stability, according to the report published online April 28 in Pediatrics.

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USPSTF Recommends Behavioral Counseling to Prevent STIs

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends intensive behavioral counseling for all sexually active adolescents and adults at increased risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In a second recommendation, the Task Force also advises chlamydia and gonorrhea screening for women at risk of infection.

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Review: Induction of Labor Tied to Lower Risk of C-Section

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Induction of labor is associated with a lower risk of cesarean delivery and with benefits for the fetus and no increase in maternal death, according to a review published online April 28 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Initial Reproductive Health Visit Suggested at Age 13 to 15 Years

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An initial visit for screening and provision of reproductive preventive health care services is recommended between the ages of 13 to 15 years, according to a Committee Opinion published in the May issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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AHA Releases Statement on Fetal Cardiac Disease

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A writing group appointed by the American Heart Association has released a scientific statement regarding fetal cardiac care; the statement has been published online April 24 in Circulation.

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AAP Cautions Against High-Deductible Health Plans for Kids

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- High-deductible health plans (HDHPs) are an increasingly popular way to reduce health care expenditures, but may be particularly inappropriate for children, according to an American Association of Pediatrics (AAP) Policy Statement published online April 28 in Pediatrics.

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AAP Issues Guidance for Freestanding Urgent Care Facilities

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Guidance is provided for freestanding urgent care facilities serving children in an American Association of Pediatrics (AAP) Policy Statement published online April 28 in Pediatrics.

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Pediatricians Should Plan for Anthrax Attack

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children may require different treatment than adults after exposure to anthrax, according to a report published online April 28 in Pediatrics.

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Cognitive Behavioral Tx Beats Relaxation Tx in Childhood OCD

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Family-based (FB) cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is superior to FB relaxation treatment (FB-RT) for young children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), according to a study published online April 23 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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One in 13 U.S. Schoolkids Take Psych Meds

FRIDAY, April 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, and more than half of the parents said the drugs are helping their children, according to an April data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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CDC: Measles on Upswing Despite Vaccines' Effectiveness

FRIDAY, April 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinations have prevented an estimated 732,000 deaths, 21 million hospitalizations, and 322 million illnesses among U.S. children born in the last 20 years, according to a government report published in the April 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Impact of Rising Incidence of Measles Discussed

THURSDAY, April 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- With the rising incidence of measles, the importance of vaccination should be emphasized and precautions must be exercised in cases of suspected measles, according to a commentary piece published online April 24 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physician Groups Find Fault With Medicare Payment Data Release

THURSDAY, April 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physician groups cite major problems associated with the release of Medicare payment data, according to an article published April 16 in Medical Economics.

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Down Syndrome Kids Fare Better Than Others After Heart Repair

THURSDAY, April 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children with Down syndrome, compared with those without this genetic condition, are more likely to survive to discharge following surgical repair of congenital heart disease, according to research published online April 22 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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No Link Between Labor Induction, Augmentation and Autism

THURSDAY, April 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Current evidence suggests no correlation between labor induction and augmentation and the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a Committee Opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published in the May issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Educational Changes Suggested for Patient-Centered Medicine

THURSDAY, April 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in medical education and training are suggested to help new physicians address the needs of patients and their families, according to an ideas and opinions piece published in the April 22 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Review: Sugar-Sweetened Drink Intake Tied to Elevated BP

WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake is associated with elevated blood pressure (BP), according to a review published in the May 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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FDA Proposes Accelerated Medical Device Approval Plan

WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed a new program that would provide expedited access to high-risk medical devices intended for patients with serious conditions whose medical needs are not met by current technology.

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Irritable Bowel Ups Likelihood of Celiac Disease in Children

WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of celiac disease is four times higher in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), compared to the general pediatric population, according to a study published online April 21 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Lorazepam No Better Than Diazepam for Epilepsy in Kids

TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Lorazepam should not be preferentially used over diazepam in pediatric patients with convulsive status epilepticus, according to a study published in the April 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Some Docs Still Prescribe Codeine for Peds Cough/URI

TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Despite national guidelines recommending against its use in children, some physicians continue to prescribe codeine for pediatric cough or upper respiratory infection (URI), according to research published online April 21 in Pediatrics.

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Pre-HPV Vaccine, Most Oropharyngeal Cancers HPV+

TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Most oropharyngeal cancers in the United States diagnosed between 1995 and 2005 were positive for human papillomavirus (HPV), specifically HPV 16 or 18, according to a study published in the May issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Abridged Food Education Program for Children Still Helpful

TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An abbreviated version of the Nutrition Detectives Program improves students' food-label literacy, according to a study published online April 10 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Task Force Recommends Ways to Improve Price Transparency

MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Price transparency frameworks, which provide price information presented in the context of other relevant information, should be developed to meet patients' needs, according to recommendations presented in a report from the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA).

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New Muscular Dystrophy Drug's Chances for Approval Improve

MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy may be closer to becoming the first approved treatment for the disease.

Health Highlights: April 21, 2014

Most Adolescents Sleep Six to Seven Hours on Week Nights

MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents from families of lower socioeconomic class sleep six to seven hours a night during the school week, with less sleep and more fragmented sleep reported by blacks and males, according to a study published online April 21 in Pediatrics.

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Some Children Gain Weight After Tonsil Removal Surgery

MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Younger children and those with lower pre-surgery weight percentiles are most likely to gain more weight than expected following adenotonsillectomy, according to a study published online April 17 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

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Antibiotics Improve Children's Growth in Poorer Nations

MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In low and middle income countries, antibiotics have a growth promoting effect in prepubertal children, according to research published online April 15 in BMJ.

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AMA Examines Economic Impact of Physicians

FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who mainly engage in patient care contribute a total of $1.6 trillion in economic output, according to the American Medical Association (AMA)'s Economic Impact Study.

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Indoor Tanning Tied to Unhealthy Weight Control Behavior

FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who indoor tan, especially males, are more likely to exhibit unhealthy weight control behaviors, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics.

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Int'l Medical Education Standards Not Equivalent to U.K. Standards

FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- International medical graduates passing the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB) of the General Medical Council (GMC) have lower performance on MRCP(UK) (Membership of the Royal Colleges of Physicians) and MRCGP (Membership of the Royal College of General Practitioners) and on annual review of competence progression (ARCP) examinations, according to two studies published online April 17 in BMJ.

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White House: 8 Million People Signed Up for Health Insurance

FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eight million Americans signed up for private health insurance during the just-concluded first enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act, the White House announced Thursday afternoon.

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One in 20 U.S. Adults a Victim of Diagnostic Errors

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnostic errors affect at least one in 20 U.S. adults, according to research published online April 17 in BMJ Quality & Safety.

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Educator Discusses Key Issues for Future Doctors to Consider

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The key issues for future physicians are discussed in an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Patient-Clinician Relationship Impacts Health Care Outcomes

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The patient-clinician relationship has a small but significant effect on health care outcomes, according to a study published online April 9 in PLOS ONE.

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Adverse Neonatal Outcomes Up With Increasing Maternal BMI

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Increases in maternal body mass index (BMI) are associated with increased risks of adverse perinatal and neonatal outcomes, according to research published in the April 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Extensive Atypical Antipsychotic Use in Medicaid-Insured Youth

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid-insured youth, particularly those in foster care and those diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), have considerable exposure to atypical antipsychotics, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

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Continued Reliance on Windows XP May Threaten Data Security

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who use Windows XP in their practices may be affected by Microsoft's recent discontinuation of support for the program, according to an article published April 8 in Medical Economics.

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Mom Gaining Too Much, Too Little May Up Child's Obesity Risk

TUESDAY, April 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children born to mothers who gain either too much or too little weight during their pregnancy are more likely to be overweight or obese, according to a study published online April 14 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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CDC: Drowning Deaths Down Overall, but Still a Problem

TUESDAY, April 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Drowning deaths are still a problem in the United States, even though overall deaths from drowning are down, according to a report published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's April edition of the National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief.

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Younger Adults Hit Hardest This Flu Season

TUESDAY, April 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The H1N1 flu was the predominant influenza strain in the United States this year, but it packed a lot less punch than in 2009 when it caused a worldwide pandemic, health officials report.

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Patients Paying Much More for Specialty Drugs

TUESDAY, April 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans are paying less for prescription drugs, but some are having to deal with sharp rises in the cost of specialty medicines for rare or serious diseases, according to a new report.

Health Highlights: April 15, 2014

U.S. Kids Exposed to Arsenic in Well Water Have Lower IQs

TUESDAY, April 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to arsenic in drinking water from wells may lower IQ in children, according to research published online April 1 in Environmental Health.

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Pediatric Devices Still Have Few Premarket Studies in Children

MONDAY, April 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Most high-risk pediatric devices are approved based on trials that don't involve children under 18 years of age, according to a study published online April 14 in Pediatrics.

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Prenatal SSRI Exposure May Up Odds of Autism in Boys

MONDAY, April 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For boys, prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with increased likelihood of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental delays (DDs), according to a study published online April 14 in Pediatrics.

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New Health Secretary to Confront Health Care Reform Hurdles

MONDAY, April 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- With the resignation of U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Friday, the Affordable Care Act will get a fresh face. But turning around public perception of the controversial health care reform law in a politically charged mid-term election year poses an enormous challenge for the department's next leader, policy experts said.

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AAFP Provides Tips to Address Patients' Vaccine Concerns

MONDAY, April 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians remain the biggest influence on whether patients get vaccinated, and must be prepared to address patients' reservations, according to an article published in the March/April issue of Family Practice Management.

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$31.3B Spent on Development Assistance for Health in 2013

FRIDAY, April 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Disease burden, income, and funding levels are not always aligned in the allocation of development assistance resources, according to a study published online April 8 in Health Affairs.

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Parents Feel Limited in Ability to Prevent Child Obesity

FRIDAY, April 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Parents want to help their children avoid obesity but feel limited in their ability to take action, according to a study published online April 3 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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CDC: Measles Cases Linked to U.S. Adoptions From China

FRIDAY, April 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A series of measles cases in the United States involving children adopted from China highlights the importance of vaccinations for any adopted child from overseas, according to a report published in the April 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Sebelius Stepping Down As HHS Secretary

FRIDAY, April 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is stepping down from her position, after overseeing the troubled rollout of the Affordable Care Act that remains unpopular with some Americans and virtually all Republican lawmakers.

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Prevalence of Childhood Obesity in U.S. Up From 1999

THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- From 1999, all classes of obesity have increased in children, although the rates in 2011 to 2012 were not significantly different from those in 2009 to 2010, according to a study published online April 7 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Cortisol Response Associated With Crash Risk in Teen Drivers

THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cortisol level in response to stress is associated with crash risk in teenaged drivers, according to research published online April 7 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Updated Reviews Issued for Oseltamivir, Zanamivir Use in Flu

THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Oseltamivir and zanamivir reduce the time to symptomatic improvement in influenza by about half a day, but evidence to support claims of reduced admissions to hospital or complications of influenza is lacking, according to two systematic reviews of regulatory information published online April 10 in BMJ.

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Fewer Americans Overwhelmed by Medical Bills

WEDNESDAY, April 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- While millions of Americans still feel hamstrung by medical expenses, a new government report shows that some people are getting relief.

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More Justification Needed for Choosing Wisely Selections

WEDNESDAY, April 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Most services included in specialty medical societies' Top 5 lists for the Choosing Wisely campaign are based on evidence demonstrating equivalent but not superior benefit, with higher risk or higher costs compared to other options, according to a research letter published in the April 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Men With Eating Disorders Face Delayed Symptom Recognition

WEDNESDAY, April 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cultural misperceptions of eating disorders as a female problem pose a barrier to recognition of symptoms in men, according to a study published in the April issue of BMJ Open.

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Obese Child Incurs Extra $19,000 Lifetime Medical Costs

WEDNESDAY, April 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The incremental lifetime medical cost of an obese child compared to a normal-weight child who maintains normal weight throughout adulthood is roughly $19,000, according to a study published online April 7 in Pediatrics.

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Some Doctors Paid at Least $3 Million Each by Medicare

WEDNESDAY, April 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A small number of doctors received at least $3 million each in Medicare payments in 2012, for a total of nearly $1.5 billion, according to an analysis of Medicare claims data released Wednesday by the White House. In total, Medicare paid individual physicians nearly $64 billion in 2012. The median payment was just over $30,000, the Associated Press reported.

Health Highlights: April 9, 2014
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CDC: Too Many Younger Teens Still Getting Pregnant

TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a drop in teen birth rates in recent years, too many girls under 18 are still getting pregnant, U.S. health officials said Tuesday.

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Benefits of Neonatal Circumcision Outweigh Risks

TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The benefits of neonatal circumcision exceed any risks by at least 100 to one, according to a review published online April 4 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Perceived Stress Positively Linked to Allergy Flares

TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Those with persistent emotional stress may have more frequent allergy flares, according to a study published in the April issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Inverse Link for Carotenoid Intake, Benign Breast Disease

TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For adolescent girls, β-carotene intake is inversely associated with the risk of benign breast disease (BBD), according to a study published online April 7 in Pediatrics.

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NCQA Updates Recognition Standards for Medical Homes

TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) has updated its guidelines for patient-centered medical homes, according to an article published March 27 in Medical Economics.

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Decrease in Tobacco Use on TV Dramas Since 1955

TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The portrayal of tobacco use on television (TV) dramas has decreased since 1955, in line with historical cigarette consumption trends, according to a study published online April 3 in Tobacco Control.

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Parental Addictions Linked to Arthritis in Adulthood

TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A history of parental addictions is associated with cumulative lifetime incidence of arthritis in adulthood, even after adjustment for potential risk factors, according to a study published online March 23 in the International Journal of Population Research.

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Few Good Resources on Self-Harm Exist Online

MONDAY, April 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People seeking help online for cutting and other forms of self-harm often receive incorrect or misleading information, according to a new study published online March 24 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Road Design Affects Motor Vehicle-Pedestrian Collisions

MONDAY, April 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For school children, the correlation between walking to school and pedestrian collisions is not significant after adjustment for road design variables, according to a study published online April 7 in Pediatrics.

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Newly Eligible for Expanded Medicaid Are Healthier

MONDAY, April 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Persons newly eligible for expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are not sicker than pre-ACA enrollees, according to research published online March 26 in Health Affairs.

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Atopic Dermatitis Symptoms Persist Through Childhood

MONDAY, April 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For children with atopic dermatitis, symptoms persist throughout childhood into adulthood, according to a study published online April 2 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Paternal Obesity Linked to Elevated Autism Risk in Children

MONDAY, April 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Paternal obesity is associated with increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children, according to a study published online April 7 in Pediatrics.

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Patients Select Fewer New Docs at Bottom of Tiered Ranking

MONDAY, April 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients are less likely to select a new physician ranked in the bottom of a tiered network, but often don't switch if their current physician is ranked at the bottom, according to research published online March 11 in Health Services Research.

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Sexual Coercion Commonly Experienced by Teen Males

FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent males report frequent sexual coercion, according to a study published online March 17 in Psychology of Men & Masculinity.

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Hearing Aid Use in Children With Mild Loss Improves Speech

FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The level of hearing improvement achieved by hearing aid (HA) use in children correlates with better speech and language development, according to a study published online April 3 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

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AMA Provides Resources to Aid Physicians' Collections

FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association (AMA) has released resources to help doctors confront policy jumpers who may pose a financial risk to physicians during the Affordable Care Act's 90-day premium grace period, according to an article published March 25 in Medical Economics.

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Early Childhood Interventions Greatly Improve Later Health

FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Early childhood interventions substantially improve health into adulthood, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of Science.

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Pending Malpractice Litigation May Bias Parents' Reports

FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Following neonatal brachial plexus palsy, medical malpractice litigation is associated with worse parent reports of their child's function and pain, according to a study published in the March 5 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Breath-Actuated, Handheld Nebulizers Yield Similar Results

FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There are no significant clinical differences between the use of a breath-actuated nebulizer (BAN) and a handheld nebulizer (HHN) for the treatment of wheezing or dyspnea among adults seen in the emergency department, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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CDC: Calls to Poison Centers for E-Cigarette Exposure Up

THURSDAY, April 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a recent increase in the number of calls to poison centers regarding electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) exposure, according to research published in the April 4 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Probiotic Not Found Beneficial for Infants With Colic

THURSDAY, April 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 does not provide benefit for breastfed or formula fed infants with colic, according to a study published online April 1 in BMJ.

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FDA Approves Sublingual Tablet for Grass Allergies

WEDNESDAY, April 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Oralair has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the first sublingual treatment for certain grass allergies.

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Root-Cause Analysis Advised for Neonatal Encephalopathy

WEDNESDAY, April 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The importance of root-cause analysis for neonatal encephalopathy is emphasized in the second edition of the Task Force Report on Neonatal Encephalopathy and Neurologic Outcome, published jointly by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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Half of Uninsured Don't Intend to Sign Up for Health Coverage

WEDNESDAY, April 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About 50 percent of uninsured adults do not intend to sign up for coverage through the Affordable Care Act's health care exchanges, according to an article published March 26 in Medical Economics.

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Less Sleep Tied to Greater Food Intake in Children

WEDNESDAY, April 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Shorter nighttime sleep duration is tied with higher energy intake early in life, according to a study published online March 26 in the International Journal of Obesity.

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CMS: Medicare Beneficiaries Saved $3.9B on Meds in 2013

TUESDAY, April 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In 2013, 4.3 million seniors and people with disabilities saved an estimated $3.9 billion on prescription drugs, an increase from the 2012 savings, according to a report published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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Smoke-Free Legislation Has Significant Health Benefits

TUESDAY, April 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Introduction of smoke-free legislation is associated with reductions in preterm birth and hospital attendance for asthma, according to a review published online March 28 in The Lancet.

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