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September 2014 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: October 01, 2014.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for September 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Low Professional Liability for No Esophageal Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of medical professional liability claims alleging failure to screen for esophageal cancer is not a reason to screen for esophageal cancer, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Antibiotic Use Before Age 2 Might Raise Obesity Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are given broad-spectrum antibiotics before the age of 2 may face a slightly higher risk of becoming obese during childhood, according to research published online Sept. 29 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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'Just-in-Time' Methodology Can Reduce Patient Waiting Times

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Having trainee physicians review cases prior to clinic hours can reduce patient waiting times, flow times, and clinic session times, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in Pain Medicine. The management process studied was first popularized by Toyota in Japan.

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Daytime Cholecystectomy May Be Better for Acute Cholecystitis

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who require cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis are more likely to have a minimally invasive procedure if they have the surgery during daytime rather than at night, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in the American Journal of Surgery.

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AMA Launches Three Programs for Physician Wellness

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' personal health is a global concern and three initiatives are being developed to encourage positive change, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Experiences Trump Things, Even Before Purchase

FRIDAY, Sept. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People derive value from the anticipation of purchasing something, and this anticipation tends to be greater for an experiential purchase than for a material purchase, according to a study published online Aug. 21 in Psychological Science.

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Oral Sodium Phosphate Doesn't Up Acute Kidney Injury

FRIDAY, Sept. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Use of oral sodium phosphate (OSP) for bowel cleansing prior to a colonoscopy is not associated with the risk of postprocedure acute kidney injury (AKI), according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Can Media Multitasking Alter Your Brain?

THURSDAY, Sept. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Multitasking with smartphones, laptop computers, and other media devices could change the structure of your brain, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in PLOS ONE.

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Meta-Analysis: Anti-TNF Therapy Deemed Safe for Children

THURSDAY, Sept. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy appears to be safe, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Most Doctors Are Over-Extended or at Full Capacity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians report being over-extended or at full capacity, according to a survey conducted by Merritt Hawkins for The Physicians Foundation.

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Gut Microbiome Diversity Linked to Endogenous Estrogens

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Diversity of fecal microbiome is associated with an increased ratio of hydroxylated estrogen metabolites to parent estrogen, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Report Identifies Game Changers for U.S. Health Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine if doctors and hospitals got paid for providing better care, not more care, and patients had better data for making informed health choices. A new report suggests that's the direction the U.S. health system is headed.

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FDA Warns Doctors of Danger From 'Fake' Drugs

TUESDAY, Sept. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The number of "rogue" wholesale distributors selling fake or unapproved prescription drugs is growing, so doctors need to be vigilant when purchasing medicines, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Tuesday.

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Generic Discount Drug Program Use Has Increased Over Time

TUESDAY, Sept. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the generic discount drug program (GDDP) for filling prescriptions with generic drugs has increased since its introduction, according to a research letter published online Sept 22 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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NIH Adds $10M to Encourage Gender Balance in Clinical Trials

TUESDAY, Sept. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. National Institutes of Health is investing $10 million in additional funding in scientific trials to encourage researchers to consider gender in their preclinical and clinical studies.

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Pancreatic Cancer Risk Not Higher With Diabetes Rx DPP-4i

MONDAY, Sept. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There is no increased short-term pancreatic cancer risk with dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) compared to sulfonylureas (SU) and thiazolidinediones (TZD) for glycemic control, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Systemwide Changes Needed to Restrain Health Care Spending

FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Systemwide changes are necessary to prevent excessive health care spending, and so are tools to help consumers make better, more informed medical choices, according to a white paper published in June by Vitals.

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Recent Increase in Liver Injury From Herbs, Supplements

FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of liver injury cases resulting from herbals and dietary supplements (HDS) has increased significantly in the last decade, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Hepatology.

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Presence of Peers Ups Health Workers' Hand Hygiene

FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of other health care workers improves hand hygiene adherence, according to a study published in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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Strategies Can Help Docs Lower Their Tax Burden

THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies are presented to help physicians lower their tax burden in an article published Sept. 2 in Medical Economics.

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CDC: Almost Everyone Needs a Flu Shot

THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of all Americans got a flu shot last year, so U.S. health officials on Thursday urged that everyone 6 months and older get vaccinated for the coming flu season. "It's really unfortunate that half of Americans are not getting the protection from flu they could get," said Thomas Frieden, M.D., director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, during a morning news conference.

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Wild Berry May Boost Effect of Chemo for Pancreatic Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The use of micronutrients such as chokeberry extract may augment the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy drugs on cancer cells, according to research published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Pathology.

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Artificial Sweeteners May Raise Blood Glucose Levels

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial sweeteners can potentially make blood glucose levels rise despite containing no calories, researchers report online Sept. 17 in Nature.

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Internists Report Considerable EMR-Linked Time Loss

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Use of electronic medical record (EMR) systems is associated with considerable loss of free time per clinic day, according to a research letter published online Sept. 8 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Doctors Promoting Transparency With Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to increase transparency among doctors are underway, according to an article published in The Boston Globe.

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FDA Approves Movantik for Opioid-Induced Constipation

TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Movantik (naloxegol) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat opioid-induced constipation, the agency said Tuesday.

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AACR: Targeted Drugs Among Successes Against Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About 14.5 million U.S. cancer survivors are alive today, compared to just three million in 1971, the American Association for Cancer Research reported Tuesday.

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Over a Quarter of Hospital Orders Classified As Defensive

TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-quarter of hospital medicine services were rated by ordering physicians as at least a partially defensive order, according to a research letter published online Sept. 15 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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New Role of Patient As Consumer Requires Market Changes

FRIDAY, Sept. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The new consumer retail market in U.S. health care is necessary and will benefit consumers, and as consumers take on more costs of care, access to information to help them make informed decisions is crucial, according to a recent white paper published by Vitals.

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Errata Frequently Seen in Medical Literature

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Errata, including those that may materially change the interpretation of data, are frequent in medical publications, according to a study published in the August issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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Physician Describes Impact of Malpractice Suit

THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A family doctor who was involved in a malpractice suit describes the impact on her practice of medicine in an article published online in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Factors ID'd for CRC Risk Stratification With Positive FIT

THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Fecal hemoglobin concentration, sex, and age can be used to classify the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia among individuals with positive results from fecal immunochemical tests (FITs), according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology.

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Fear About Disease Progression Prompts ER Returns

THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Perceived inability to access timely follow-up care and uncertainty and fear about disease progression are the main reasons for return visits to the emergency department, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Reanalyses of RCTs Can Lead to Different Conclusions

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-third of the small number of reanalyses of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have implied conclusions different from those of the original articles, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Meta-Analysis: Prediabetes Linked to Increased Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Prediabetes is associated with an elevated risk of cancer overall and with increased risks of site-specific cancers, including liver, endometrial, and stomach/colorectal cancer, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 8 in Diabetologia.

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For Some, Health Insurance More Costly Than Uninsured Penalty

TUESDAY, Sept. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For some young people in the United States, the cost of paying a penalty for not buying health insurance will be lower than the lowest-cost insurance, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Report Explores Patients' Portal Preferences

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients want portals that include features such as appointment scheduling, viewing test results, and checking prescription refills, and are frustrated with unresponsive staff and poor interfaces, according to a report published by Software Advice.

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Health Care Spending Expected to Rise in 2014 Through 2023

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- While health spending growth was slow in 2013, health spending is expected to increase in 2014 and remain higher through 2023, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Health Affairs.

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Blog: Seven Most Common Physician Social Media Misses

THURSDAY, Sept. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The most common physician social media misses and missteps can be avoided, allowing doctors to take advantage of marketing opportunities on all major social media channels, according to the author of a recent Vitals blog.

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Vagal Nerve Block Therapy in Morbid Obesity Explored

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Vagal nerve block therapy may be effective for weight loss in morbid obesity, and trends in bariatric surgery procedures have changed from 2006 to 2013, according to two studies published in the Sept. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Gluten-Free Diet Benefits Asymptomatic EmA+ Adults

TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Asymptomatic individuals with endomysial antibodies (EmA) benefit from a gluten-free diet (GFD), according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology.

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