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Infectious Diseases Society of America, Oct. 8-12

Last Updated: October 13, 2014.

The Infectious Diseases Society of America Annual Meeting (IDWeek 2014)

The annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDWeek) was held from Oct. 8 to 12 in Philadelphia and attracted more than 5,000 participants from around the world, including scientists, physicians, and other health care professionals. The conference featured education courses and comprehensive educational programs that focused on the latest advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of infectious diseases as well as provided insight into emerging infections, new diagnostics, vaccines, and therapeutic interventions.

During one presentation, Shira Doron, M.D., of the Tufts Medical Center in Boston, discussed the success of a multi-faceted program funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The program involved the education of providers working at long-term care facilities from across the state on the topic of urinary tract infection.

"Specifically, the program emphasized the importance of the proper evaluation and management of long-term care residents with suspected urinary tract infection, with particular attention to the difference between bladder colonization with bacteria (asymptomatic bacteriuria) and infection," said Doron. "It is very common for providers in long-term care facilities to send urine tests when residents display a variety of signs and symptoms. These urine tests are often misinterpreted, leading to treatment with antibiotics for urinary tract infection when the patient is in fact not infected."

Doron and colleagues conducted their educational program twice. During each program, over a period of several months, they conducted workshops, webinars, and conference calls with participants. They also provided tools, including printed materials.

"As a result of our program, we were able to demonstrate a decrease in the rate of urine testing as well as a reduction in the number of diagnoses of urinary tract infection. During the first year, we even showed a reduction of Clostridium difficile infection," said Doron. "Future goals include focusing similar efforts in other health care settings such as acute care and long-term acute care."

Abstract No. 40

Eugene Millar, M.D., of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues found that self-administration of intranasal influenza vaccine (FluMist) by adults was feasible and safe. The study was conducted among active duty military members.

"This study of more than 1,000 adult volunteers, virtually all of them active duty military members, demonstrated that intranasal influenza vaccine (FluMist) can be self-administered by adults. The two groups -- self-administered vaccine and health care worker-administered vaccine -- did not differ with respect to the immune response to FluMist," said Millar. "Moreover, there were no differences in safety and reactogenicity between the two groups, and in a post-trial survey, those who were in the self-administered vaccine groups stated that they preferred self-administration."

Abstract No. 1162

In another study, Ilan Youngster, M.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues evaluated a fecal transplantation approach using an encapsulated product that could be consumed orally. The investigators found that the capsule-based approach worked just as effectively as performing fecal transplantation using invasive means of delivery, without the risk of serious complications.

"It is important that fecal transplantation is performed under medical supervision, as there are many home brews and Internet videos explaining how to perform the procedure without proper screening, which can be dangerous," said Youngster. "Our findings make fecal transplantation more accessible, with fewer risks, and hopefully will bring more patients in for this approach so that medical supervision can be ensured."

One author disclosed financial ties to Seres Health.

Abstract No. 1798

IDSA: Frozen Fecal Microbiota Capsules Feasible for C. difficile

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with relapsing Clostridium difficile infection, administration of frozen fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) capsules from prescreened unrelated donors is feasible, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDWeek), held from Oct. 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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IDSA: Common Childhood Vaccine Cuts 'Superbug' Infection

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccine may be contributing to fewer infections from antibiotic-resistant "superbugs," according to new research. The findings are being presented at the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDWeek), held from Oct. 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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IDSA: Docs Need Feedback to Keep Good Prescribing Habits

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Benefits of an outpatient antimicrobial stewardship intervention were lost after audit and feedback to clinicians was removed, according to research published online Oct. 10 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDWeek), held from Oct. 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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IDSA: Hospitalized Kids Benefit From Antibiotic Stewardship

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New research finds that children who are hospitalized get discharged sooner and come back less often when hospitals take extra efforts to control treatment utilizing antibiotics. The research is being presented at the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDWeek), held from Oct. 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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IDSA: Contact Sports Boost Spread of MRSA

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- College athletes in contact sports such as football and soccer are more than twice as likely as other college athletes to carry methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDWeek), held from Oct. 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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IDSA: Infection Rates in Nursing Homes on the Rise

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Infection rates within U.S. nursing homes are on the rise, and that trend will continue until better hygiene practices are put in place, according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDWeek), held from Oct. 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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IDSA: Elevated Vancomycin MICs Not Linked to Higher Mortality

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- No association has been detected between vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and mortality among patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), according to research published online Oct. 9 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDWeek), held from Oct. 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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