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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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January 2015 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: February 02, 2015.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for January 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Recurrent Kidney Stones Linked to Arterial Calcium Deposits

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some people who develop recurring kidney stones may also have high levels of calcium deposits in their blood vessels, and that could explain their increased risk for cardiovascular disease, new research suggests. The findings were published online Jan. 29 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Colorectal Cancer Rates on Rise in Young Americans

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although the overall rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) has fallen in recent decades, new research suggests that over the last 20 years the disease has been increasing among young and early middle-aged American adults. Results of the study were published in the December issue of the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.

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Heavy Drinking in Middle Age Rivals HTN, DM As Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who average more than two drinks a day have a 34 percent higher risk of stroke compared to those whose daily average amounts to less than half a drink, according to findings published online Jan. 29 in Stroke.

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Cancer Diagnosis Impacts Patient Adherence to Diabetes Rx

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with diabetes are less likely to take their diabetes medications if they've been diagnosed with cancer, researchers report. The findings were published online Jan. 28 in Diabetologia.

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Isolated Systolic High BP in 30s May Up Risk of Earlier Death

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Isolated systolic high blood pressure in young adulthood is a predictor of cardiovascular disease mortality 30 years down the road, a new study suggests. The report was published in the Feb. 3 issue of Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Topical Acne Gel Linked to Methemoglobinemia

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of topical dapsone may have led to the development of methemoglobinemia, according to a case study published in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CDC: Measles Cases in January Top Typical Load for Entire Year

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The United States has seen more cases of measles in January than it usually does in an entire year, federal health officials said Thursday.

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Cutting Added Fructose Could Reduce Diabetes-Linked Morbidity

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing consumption of added sugars, particularly added fructose, could reduce diabetes-related morbidity, according to an article published online Jan. 29 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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National Prenatal Screening Program Increased CHD Detection

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a national screening program in the Netherlands increased the prenatal detection rate of congenital heart disease (CHD), according to a study published online Jan. 27 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Cardiovascular, Cerebral Effect for Red Bull + Mental Stress

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Red Bull consumption combined with mental stress correlates with increased blood pressure (BP) and heart rate, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CDC: ~8 Percent of U.S. Adults Nonadherent Due to Rx Costs

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adults don't take their medications as prescribed because they can't afford to, according to a January data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Less-Tight Control of Non-Severe BP in Pregnancy OK for Fetus

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When pregnant women have non-severe hypertension, more-intensive treatment doesn't seem to affect their babies, but it may lower the odds that mothers will develop severe hypertension. That's the conclusion of a clinical trial reported in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Eye Tracking Could Quantify Symptoms of Brain Injury

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eye tracking may help quantify the severity of disconjugate eye movements associated with concussion and brain injury, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in the Journal of Neurotrauma.

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Liberals, Independents Found to Have Greater Longevity

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to people with conservative and moderate political ideologies, liberals were found less likely to die over the course of a 30-year review. But party lines did not determine life span, with Independents faring better than Republicans and Democrats, according to the research published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Starting Football Young May Lead to Higher Cognitive Risks

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Boys who start playing tackle football before the age of 12 may face a higher risk for neurological deficits as adults, according to research published online Jan. 28 in Neurology.

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PCBs, Phthalates Linked to Earlier Menopause

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found that menopause typically begins two to four years earlier in women with high levels of certain chemicals found in household items, personal care products, plastics, and the environment, compared to women with lower levels of the chemicals. The study was published online Jan. 28 in PLOS ONE.

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Following BP Guidelines Will Save Lives and Money

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If all Americans had their hypertension under control, 56,000 fewer cardiovascular events would occur each year. And 13,000 fewer people would die -- without increasing health costs, according to research published in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Triglycerides Significantly Elevated in Women With GDM

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), triglycerides are significantly elevated throughout pregnancy, according to a review published online Jan. 22 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Teledermoscopy Feasible, Effective for Monitoring Nevi

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teledermoscopy is feasible and effective for short-term monitoring of clinically atypical nevi, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Anxiety Moderates Amyloid-β Association With Cognition

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, elevated amyloid-β (Aβ) levels correlate with cognitive decline, and elevated anxiety moderates these associations, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Hepatitis A Hospitalizations Down From 2002 to 2011

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2002 to 2011 there was a decrease in the rate of hospitalizations for hepatitis A, according to a study published in the February issue of Hepatology.

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FDA to Strengthen Approval Process for AEDs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Automated external defibrillators installed and ready for use in many public spaces can save lives when needed, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says that since 2005, it has also received 72,000 reports of the devices failing.

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Sleeping Well in Middle Age May Pay Off Later in Life

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sleeping well during middle age may be an investment that leads to better mental functioning later in life, a new review finds. The findings were published in the January issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science.

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Real-Time Mobile App Can Improve Sun Protection

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A smartphone application providing real-time advice about sun protection offers some improvement in sun protection behaviors, according to two studies published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Benefits Package Important for Attracting, Retaining Staff

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An appropriately-targeted benefits package is crucial for attracting and retaining employees, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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AAFP Advocates for Planned Vaginal Birth After Cesarean

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A planned labor and vaginal birth after cesarean (LAC/VBAC) is an appropriate option for most women with a history of prior cesarean birth, according to a clinical practice guideline published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Many Seniors Not Reporting Falls to Physician

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans aged 65 and older fall every year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But, fewer than half tell their doctor, according to a news release issued by the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

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Sugary Drink Consumption Tied to Earlier Menarche

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Girls who consume a lot of sugary drinks may begin menstruating earlier than girls who don't, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Human Reproduction.

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Current Smoking Reduces Survival in Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Current smoking reduces odds of survival in prostate cancer, according to a new study published online Jan. 27 in BJU International.

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Daily Blueberry Consumption May Reduce Blood Pressure

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension, daily blueberry consumption may reduce blood pressure and arterial stiffness, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Postmenopausal Weight Loss or Gain Ups Risk of Fracture

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of fractures increases with both weight gain and loss in older women, according to a new study published Jan. 27 in The BMJ.

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Women With PCOS Hospitalized More Often

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at increased risk for a number of serious health problems, according to research published online Dec. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Chlorhexidine Bathing Doesn't Cut Health Care-Linked Infections

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For critically ill patients, chlorhexidine bathing does not reduce health-care-associated infections, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sedation Protocol Doesn't Reduce Duration of Ventilation in PICU

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure, the use of a sedation protocol does not reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Impact of Intensive Lifestyle Change on CV Burden Studied

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive lifestyle modifications, the cornerstones of atherosclerotic disease management, are associated with a decrease in coronary and carotid atherosclerotic burden, according to a review published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Glucose Breath Test Positivity Up in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The positive rate of the glucose breath test is higher in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially Crohn's disease, than in healthy controls, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Benefit of Noninvasive Tests in Non-MI Chest Pain Questioned

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients seen in emergency departments solely for chest pain not due to myocardial infarction, noninvasive screening tests for coronary heart disease do not appear to benefit the prediction of future cardiovascular events, a new study suggests. The report was published online Jan. 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Difficulty Falling Asleep Linked to Higher Risk of Hypertension

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic insomniacs who regularly take longer than 14 minutes to fall asleep appear to be at a significantly increased risk for hypertension, according to research published online Jan. 26 in Hypertension.

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Provider Demographics Affect Pain Treatment Decisions

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pain management treatment decisions may be impacted by a health care provider's demographic characteristics, according to a study published in the January issue of Pain Medicine.

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FDA Approves Generic Form of Nexium

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic version of Nexium (esomeprazole magnesium delayed-release capsules) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease in adults and children ages 1 and older.

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Duration of Hyperlipidemia in 30s/40s Impacts CHD Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People at age 55 who've lived with 11 to 20 years of high cholesterol show double the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) compared to people who age with only one to 10 years of high cholesterol, and quadruple the risk of people who had low cholesterol levels. These findings were published online Jan. 26 in Circulation.

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Many Breast Cancer Patients Lack Knowledge of Their Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many women with breast cancer lack basic knowledge about their disease, such as their cancer stage and other characteristics, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Cancer.

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Cumulative Use of Anticholinergic Medication Tied to Dementia

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher cumulative use of anticholinergics may increase the risk of dementia, according to a new study published online Jan. 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Most PCPs Consider Advanced Imaging of Value to Patient Care

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most primary care providers (PCPs) consider advanced medical imaging to be of considerable value for patient care, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

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Studies Highlight Tools for Diagnosis of COPD

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two studies published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine evaluate the tools available for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

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FDA Approves New Meningococcal Disease Vaccine

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Bexsero vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent serogroup B meningococcal disease among people aged 10 through 25.

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Childhood Neglect Appears to Affect White Matter Integrity

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood neglect is associated with changes in the brain's white matter, according to research published online Jan. 26 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Menu Calorie Data May Prompt Parents to Encourage Exercise

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Parents might order fewer calories for their children if menus included calorie counts or information on how much walking would be required to burn off the calories in foods, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Early Alert Intervention Cuts Heart Failure Readmission

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An electronic medical record system, designed to identify patients who have been discharged from heart failure hospitalization and present in the emergency department, can prevent readmissions, according to a study published in The American Journal of Medicine.

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High Penicillin Prescribing Could Build Reservoirs of Resistance

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High penicillin G prescribing may lead to an altered level of resistance in the commensal viridans group streptococci (VGS) population, which may be important in subsequent horizontal gene transfer events, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Premature Death Risk Up for Stroke Survivors Living Alone

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke survivors -- especially men -- who live alone are at increased risk for premature death, a new study suggests.

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AAP Approves 2015 Vaccine Schedule for Children, Teens

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 2015 recommended childhood and adolescence immunization schedules have been approved by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and other medical organizations, according to a policy statement published online Jan. 26 in Pediatrics.

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AAP Opposes Legalization of Marijuana

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Marijuana shouldn't be legalized because of the potential harm it can cause children and adolescents, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. However, the group's updated policy statement, published online Jan. 26 in Pediatrics, does support the compassionate use of marijuana for children with debilitating or terminal illnesses.

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Morphine Linked With Adverse Outcomes Post-Tonsillectomy

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of morphine post-tonsillectomy should be limited, as it may be unsafe in certain children, according to a new study published online Jan. 26 in Pediatrics.

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HPV Vaccination Often Not Timely for Girls

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about half of American girls begin receiving the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine at the recommended age, according to a study published in the Jan. 29 issue of Vaccine.

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Higher Cardiovascular Risk Seen With Eczema

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with eczema may also have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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AAP Urges Parents to Vaccinate Children Against Measles

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of people infected with measles linked to the outbreak at Disney amusement parks in Southern California now stands at 70, health officials reported Thursday.

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5 Percent of Seniors Discharged From ER Admitted Within Days

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 5 percent of older Medicare beneficiaries seen in the emergency department have a hospital inpatient admission within seven days after discharge, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Video-Based Tx May Benefit Babies at Risk for Autism

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Therapy involving "video feedback" -- where parents watch videos of their interactions with their baby -- might help prevent infants at risk for autism from developing the disorder, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in The Lancet Psychiatry.

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CDC: Opioid Rx Prevalent in Reproductive-Aged Females

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Too many women of childbearing age take prescription opioids, putting any unborn babies at risk, U.S. health officials said Thursday. The report appears in the Jan. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Self-Management Program Cuts Depressive Symptoms in Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes, a self-management-oriented group program (Diabetes Motivation Strengthening [DIAMOS]) is associated with reductions in depressive symptoms, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Optimal Gestational Weight Gain in Obese Moms May Vary

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For some obese women, gestational weight gain (GWG) below that recommended in the current guidelines may be advised to reduce the risk of certain adverse pregnancy outcomes, according to research published online Jan. 18 in Obesity Reviews.

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Smaller Goals to Start Could Boost Activity in Sedentary

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Current targets call for 150 minutes of weekly exercise -- or 30 minutes of physical activity at least five days a week -- to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these standards don't need to be abandoned, they shouldn't be the primary message about exercise for inactive people, experts argue in two separate analyses published Jan. 21 in The BMJ.

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ASCO Reports Biggest Clinical Cancer Advances for 2015

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The biggest clinical cancer advances for 2015 have been identified in an annual report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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More Variation in Costs Than Outcomes of PCI in VA System

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the Veterans Affairs (VA) system, the variation in one-year risk-adjusted mortality is smaller than variation in risk-standardized costs, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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May Be Room for Improvement in U/S Transducer Hygiene

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For endoluminal procedures relying on barrier protection to avoid contamination, permeability of materials may not always be considered, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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Prophylactic Antimicrobials Overused in Urologic Surgery

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Utilization patterns indicate that antimicrobial prophylaxis is overused for urological surgeries in the community practice setting, according to research published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Overuse of Abx for Travelers' Diarrhea Creating Superbugs

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The overuse of antibiotics to treat travelers' diarrhea may contribute to the spread of drug-resistant superbugs, a new study suggests. The findings were published online Jan. 21 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Hormonal Contraceptives Linked to Higher Risk of Glioma

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for developing a glioma appears to go up with long-term use of hormonal contraceptives, new research suggests. The findings were published online in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Four Factors Impact QoL From Perspective of Dementia Sufferers

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Four factors have been identified that affect quality of life from the perspective of people with dementia. The findings were published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Very Low Yield for Imaging of Both Legs in Suspected DVT

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis (DVT), systematic imaging of both legs has a very low yield, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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High Levels of Formaldehyde Seen in E-Cigarette Vapor

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- E-cigarette vapor can contain cancer-causing formaldehyde at levels up to 15 times higher than regular cigarettes, according to a letter published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Omega-3s May Counteract Mercury Toxicity From Fish

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite concerns over mercury exposure, pregnant women who eat lots of fish may not harm their unborn children, a new study suggests. The study -- funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Seychelles government -- was published online Jan. 21 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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PCPs Can Use U/S to Rationalize Tx in Acute Shoulder Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute shoulder pain, ultrasound imaging can be used by primary care physicians to rationalize treatment, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Reviews Summarize Efficacy of Depression Tx in Primary Care

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have summarized and clarified what is known about depression treatment in primary care. The reports have been published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Survival Rates for Extremely Premature Infants on Rise

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More extremely premature U.S. infants -- those born after only 22 to 28 weeks of gestation -- are surviving, according to a new study published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physicians Rank the Best EHR Systems of 2014

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have ranked electronic health record (EHR) systems based on five key performance areas, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Metabolic Syndrome May Raise Death Risk Postangiography

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postangiography patients, metabolic syndrome is associated with increased mortality, especially in patients with stable angina, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Risks for Ebola Virus-Infected Pregnant Women Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ebola virus-infected pregnant women are at risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, according to an article published online Jan. 14 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Prolonged Sitting Is Health Hazard, Despite Exercise

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise doesn't erase the higher risk of serious illness or premature death that comes from sitting too much each day, a new review reveals. The research is published in the Jan. 20 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Prone Sleep Position Tied to Higher Mortality in Epilepsy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Prone sleeping may boost risk of sudden death in epilepsy, with higher risk for patients younger than 40, new research suggests. The findings were published online Jan. 21 in Neurology.

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FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Plaque Psoriasis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Cosentyx (secukinumab) to treat adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

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Higher Medicaid Reimbursement Ups Appointment Availability

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Increased Medicaid reimbursement to primary care providers is associated with improved appointment availability, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Rates Have Doubled

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has doubled in the past decade, the procedure is not always associated with better outcomes, according to a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The findings were published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cardiovascular Risks of Pneumonia May Linger for Years

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients hospitalized with pneumonia appear to have an increased risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from coronary heart disease for years afterward, according to a new study published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Coffee Consumption Linked With Reduced Melanoma Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Coffee drinkers have a lower risk of malignant melanoma, with a trend toward more protection with higher intake, according to findings published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Routine Oral Anticoagulants May Not Benefit All With A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Benefit from routine anticoagulation therapy to reduce risk of ischemic stroke may be unlikely in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 1, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Acupuncture Viable for Pain Relief After Joint Replacement

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture is a feasible adjunct therapy for short-term postsurgical pain management in total joint replacement, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Pain Medicine.

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Incidence of PE Hospitalizations Rises From 2001 to 2010

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of hospitalizations for pulmonary embolism (PE) increased from 2001 to 2010, and a pattern of seasonal variation can be seen in PE hospitalizations, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Roux-en-Y Surgery Can Reverse Insulin Treatment in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) strongly predicts insulin cessation after surgery in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (I-T2D) patients, independent of weight loss, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Diabetes Care.

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Tonsillectomy May Benefit Tonsillitis-Associated Psoriasis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with recalcitrant psoriasis associated with episodes of tonsillitis, tonsillectomy may be an option that can result in improvement in psoriasis, according to a review published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Fewer Vegetable-Based Proteins Tied to Metabolic Syndrome

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Decreased vegetable protein intake and increased dietary acid load are associated with higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Collaboration Between Med Students Cuts Diagnostic Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For fourth-year medical students, working collaboratively is associated with a reduction in diagnostic errors, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Docs Should Negotiate Health Care Payer Contracts

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The terms in health care payer contracts are not immutable, and contracts should be negotiated, according to an article published Jan. 9 in Medical Economics.

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A Dash More Salt Than 1,500 mg Seems to Lower Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A study of adults aged 71 to 80 indicates that daily consumption of 2,300 mg of salt didn't increase deaths, cardiovascular disease, stroke, or heart failure over 10 years. The report was published online Jan. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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AHS: Research Informs New Migraine Rx Guidelines

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have reviewed recent scientific literature and concluded that a number of classes of drugs are effective for treating acute migraine. The study, published in the January issue of Headache, will form the basis of new American Headache Society guidelines for the treatment of migraine.

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A Drink a Day May Keep Heart Failure at Bay

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having a drink each day might help lower a middle-aged person's odds for heart failure, according to a new study published online Jan. 20 in the European Heart Journal.

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H. Pylori Tied to Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis in Women

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who harbor the bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published online Jan. 19 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Vitamin B-12, Folate Mitigate Reproductive Effects of DDT

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The adverse reproductive effects of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) seem to be mitigated by vitamin B-12 and folate sufficiency, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Physicians Hit Barriers in Making Cancer Referrals

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians report encountering barriers when referring cancer patients to specialty care, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Few Patients Fill High-Intensity Statin Rx After CHD Discharge

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about a quarter of Medicare beneficiaries fill a high-intensity statin prescription after discharge from hospitalization for a coronary heart disease (CHD) event, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Bullying Linked to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For 8- to 11-year-olds, bullying is associated with lower urinary tract symptoms, according to a study published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Dyslipidemia, High BP Prevalent Among U.S. Youth

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five children and adolescents had adverse lipid concentrations, and one in ten had borderline high or high blood pressure (BP) in 2011 to 2012, according to research published online Jan. 19 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Viral Load at Delivery in ~13 Percent of Women Taking HAART

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