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February 2015 Briefing - Rheumatology

Last Updated: March 02, 2015.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Rheumatology for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Key Steps for Minimizing Liability Risk in Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Key steps should be taken to minimize the potential risk of liability resulting from use of telemedicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Distinct Immune Changes Seen in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Sx

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) appears to be linked to specific changes in a person's immune system, particularly increased amounts of chemical messengers that regulate immune responses, researchers report. The new study was published online Feb. 27 in Science Advances.

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Knee OA One Year Post-ACL Reconstruction Common

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- At one year post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), knee osteoarthritis (OA) is evident among a substantial proportion of patients, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Quality of Care Lacking for ESRD in Lupus Nephritis

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, minorities and those who lack private insurance are less likely to receive adequate care for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to lupus nephritis (LN), according to research published online Feb. 18 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Chikungunya Virus Infection Can Mimic Rheumatoid Arthritis

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus causes joint pain and swelling similar to rheumatoid arthritis, which can make diagnosis difficult, according to research published online Jan. 20 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Noncancer Pain Patients Commonly Use Benzodiazepines

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) patients who use benzodiazepines (BZDs) daily frequently have multiple comorbid mental health conditions and higher rates of emergency health care use, according to a study published in the February issue of Pain Medicine.

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Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

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Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

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Household Movement Benefits Elderly With Mobility Issues

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with physical impairments, simply reducing sedentary time benefits heart health, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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High Deductible Plans Factor Into Physician-Patient Relationship

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an environment where patients are increasingly aware of the costs of health care, physicians need to be prepared to address these issues with their patients, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Use of Nondrug, Nonsurgical Options Low in Hip, Knee OA

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Usage of nondrug, nonoperative interventions in community-dwelling individuals with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) is low, according to research published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

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Latino Physician Shortage Has Worsened Since 1980

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2010 the Latino physician shortage worsened, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Academic Medicine.

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Prevalence of Fibromyalgia Varies With Criteria Applied

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of fibromyalgia varies with the different sets of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Seven Tips Help Doctors Prepare for Meaningful Use Audits

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given that physicians are chosen for meaningful use (MU) audits at random, the best way to prepare is for a physician to assume they will be audited, according to an article published Jan. 28 in Medical Economics.

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Americans' Complementary Health Approaches Changing

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. Both surveys, which were published Feb. 10 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), looked at the overall use of alternative or complementary medicine among Americans.

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Mercury From Seafood Tied to Higher Levels of Autoantibodies

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The mercury found in some seafood may be linked to autoimmune disorders among women of childbearing age, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Smoking Impairs Rx Response in Axial Spondyloarthritis

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking may hamper the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors used to treat axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), according to a study published online Feb. 9 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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ACC/AHA Risk Score No Better for Identifying Elevated CAC in RA

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) 10-year risk score does not improve identification of those with elevated cardiovascular risk based on high coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Multidisciplinary Approach Successful in Chronic Back Pain

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medication combined with a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program can decrease disability and improve mental health in low back pain patients over several years, according to a study published online Dec. 26 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Motivational Interviewing Can Help Reach Nonadherent Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing can be a useful approach for reaching noncompliant patients, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Linked With Earlier Surgical Menopause

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Menstrual abnormalities, endometriosis, pelvic pain, hysterectomy, and early/surgical menopause are all associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), according to research published online Feb. 2 in Menopause.

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Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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