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Psoriasis Associated With Higher Diabetes Risk

Last Updated: April 21, 2009.

Patients with psoriasis are more likely to have diabetes and hypertension compared to their counterparts without the skin condition, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

TUESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psoriasis are more likely to have diabetes and hypertension compared to their counterparts without the skin condition, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abrar A. Qureshi, M.D., of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues analyzed data from the Nurses' Health Study II, on 78,061 women who provided information on lifetime history of psoriasis and were followed up from 1991 to 2005.

In all, 1,813 (2.3 percent) of the women in the cohort reported a lifetime history of psoriasis, and during the course of the study there were 1,560 incident cases of diabetes (2 percent of the total cohort) and 15,724 cases of hypertension (20 percent of the cohort). Women who reported a diagnosis of psoriasis were more likely to have diabetes and hypertension (multivariate relative risk, 1.63 and 1.17, respectively), the investigators found.

"Our study advances previous findings from cross-sectional studies and emphasizes the need to better understand the mechanisms that underlie these associations," the authors write. "These data illustrate the importance of considering psoriasis a systemic disorder rather than simply a skin disease. Further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying these associations and to find out whether psoriasis therapy can reduce the risk for diabetes and hypertension."

Authors from the study and editorial report financial relationships with the pharmaceutical industry.

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