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Sirolimus-Eluting Stents Show Long-Term Effectiveness

Last Updated: April 22, 2009.

In patients with simple and medium complexity native coronary lesions, treatment with sirolimus-eluting stents reduces the long-term risk of subsequent revascularization events compared to bare-metal stents without adversely affecting safety, according to a study published in the April 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

WEDNESDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with simple and medium complexity native coronary lesions, treatment with sirolimus-eluting stents reduces the long-term risk of subsequent revascularization events compared to bare-metal stents without adversely affecting safety, according to a study published in the April 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Giora Weisz, M.D., of the Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues conducted a five-year study of 1,058 patients who were randomly assigned to either sirolimus-eluting stents or bare-metal stents in the Sirolimus-Eluting Stent in De-Novo Native Coronary Lesions (SIRIUS) trial.

At five years, the researchers found the sirolimus group had significantly lower rates of target lesion revascularization (9.4 percent versus 24.2 percent), major adverse cardiovascular events (20.3 percent versus 33.5 percent), and target vessel failure (22.5 percent versus 33.5 percent). They also found that there were no significant group differences in death, myocardial infarction, non-target lesion revascularization, and the cumulative incidence of stent thrombosis.

"Undoubtedly, because this study only represents a slice of the patient population currently treated with sirolimus-eluting stents, additional long-term follow-up studies are essential to determine the safety and efficacy of sirolimus-eluting stents in more complex patient groups and higher-risk anatomic subsets," the authors conclude.

The SIRIUS trial was sponsored by the Cordis Corporation, a Johnson & Johnson company; several co-authors disclosed a financial relationship with Johnson & Johnson.

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