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Voglibose May Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Development

Last Updated: April 22, 2009.

Patients who have impaired glucose tolerance and who are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes are less likely to do so if they are treated with voglibose (an α-glucosidase inhibitor) compared with placebo, according to a study published online on April 22 in The Lancet.

WEDNESDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have impaired glucose tolerance and who are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes are less likely to do so if they are treated with voglibose (an α-glucosidase inhibitor) compared with placebo, according to a study published online on April 22 in The Lancet.

Ryuzo Kawamori, M.D., of the Juntendo University School of Medicine in Tokyo, and colleagues conducted a study of 1,780 Japanese patients with impaired glucose tolerance who all engaged in physical exercise and ate a normal diet. While 897 were randomized to receive 0.2 milligrams oral voglibose three times a day, 883 were given placebo. The patients were followed up for a minimum of three years, or until they developed type 2 diabetes or normoglycemia.

In all, 50 of the voglibose-treated patients went on to develop type 2 diabetes and 599 developed normoglycemia, compared with 106 and 454, respectively, of the placebo patients, the investigators found. The occurrence of adverse events was slightly higher in the treatment group at 810 (90 percent) versus 750 (85 percent) of the placebo group, the investigators found.

"Long-term prophylaxis with this α-glucosidase inhibitor in high-risk individuals with impaired glucose tolerance could provide a pharmacological option, along with lifestyle modification, to help reduce the burden of type 2 diabetes in Japan," the authors conclude.

The study was funded by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. in Osaka, Japan.

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