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Chronic Kidney Disease Linked to Higher Risk of Cancer

Last Updated: May 04, 2009.

Moderate chronic kidney disease may raise older men's risk of cancer by nearly 40 percent, according to research published online April 30 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate chronic kidney disease may raise older men's risk of cancer by nearly 40 percent, according to research published online April 30 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Germaine Wong, of Westmead Hospital in Sydney, Australia, and colleagues analyzed data from 3,654 middle-aged and elderly participants in a population-based cohort study. During a mean follow-up of 10.1 years, subjects developed 711 cancers.

The researchers found that men with at least stage 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD) had a higher risk of cancer, which was not seen in women. Starting at an estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 55 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, men showed a higher risk of cancer (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.39). The risk rose linearly as GFR decreased. Men with CKD showed higher risk of lung and urinary tract cancers, but not prostate cancer, the authors note.

"CKD is also a proinflammatory state, and there is now emerging evidence linking an association between chronic inflammation and risk for cancer. Markers of inflammation, such as white blood cell count, have also been associated with an increased risk for cancer mortality in the general population. Our findings could represent a CKD threshold below which potential uremic factors associated with reduced kidney function increase the risk for cancer independent of other, well-established risk factors, such as iatrogenic immunosuppression used after transplantation," the authors conclude.

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