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Wine Linked to Five-Year Bump in Men’s Life Expectancy

Last Updated: May 04, 2009.

Drinking wine may be associated with lower risk of cardiovascular-related death, according to research published online April 30 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking wine may be associated with lower risk of cardiovascular-related death, according to research published online April 30 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Martinette T. Streppel, of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in Bilthoven, Netherlands, and colleagues analyzed data from a cohort of 1,373 men born in the early 1900s who were examined periodically between 1960 and 2000. Participants disclosed recent alcohol consumption patterns at follow-ups.

Compared to alcohol abstinence, low levels of consumption -- less than 20 grams daily -- was linked to less cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, and all-cause mortality (hazard ratios, 0.43, 0.70, and 0.75, respectively), the investigators found. Long-term wine consumption, less than a half glass daily, was also associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease, cardiovascular, and all-cause mortality (hazard ratios, 0.61, 0.68, and 0.73, respectively), independent of total alcohol intake.

"Long-term wine consumers had about five years longer life expectancy at age 50 compared with no alcohol users. Of these five years, about two years can be attributed to an effect of alcohol intake and is in accordance with the inverse association between long-term alcohol intake and all-cause mortality found in the present study. The remaining three years can be attributed to an effect of wine consumption. However, given the wide confidence interval, the effect of wine as such may be overestimated," the authors write.

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