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Immunity Not Always Predicted by Vaccination Records

Last Updated: May 06, 2009.

Vaccination records for international adoptees do not necessarily predict protective immunity, according to a study in the May issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. In a related study, timely vaccination coverage among low-income children in the United States has largely increased in the last decade.

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination records for international adoptees do not necessarily predict protective immunity, according to a study in the May issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. In a related study, timely vaccination coverage among low-income children in the United States has largely increased in the last decade.

In the first study, Emaculate Verla-Tebit, Ph.D., and colleagues from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, examined the predictive value of vaccination records and protective immunity in 397 international adoptees within 180 days of arrival. They found that the percentage of children with protective immunity ranged from as little as 51.9 percent for polio type 3 to 94.6 percent for diphtheria. Chinese children were less likely than Russian children to have protective immunity (odds ratio, 0.34).

In the second study, Philip J. Smith, Ph.D., and colleagues from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, assessed timely vaccination coverage among 232,318 children living in low-income households in the United States between 1995 and 2007. They found that timely vaccination coverage ranged from no significant increase for Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) to increases of as much as 5.3 percent for varicella vaccines.

"In our analyses, we found that among low-income children, timely vaccination coverage rates for all vaccines except Hib have increased significantly between consecutive cohorts born after the measles resurgence [between 1989 and 1991]," Smith and colleagues conclude.

Abstract - Verla-Tebit
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Abstract - Smith
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