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Drug-Eluting Stents May Help Prevent Restenosis

Last Updated: May 06, 2009.

Drug-eluting stents had lower rates of restenosis and lower rates of lesion and vessel revascularization in head-to-head trials against bare-metal stents in two studies published in the May 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Drug-eluting stents had lower rates of restenosis and lower rates of lesion and vessel revascularization in head-to-head trials against bare-metal stents in two studies published in the May 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

In one study, Gregg W. Stone, M.D., of Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues randomly assigned (3 to 1) 3,006 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction to either a paclitaxel-eluting stent or a bare-metal stent. At 12 months, the investigators found that those receiving the drug-eluting stent had significantly fewer target lesion and target vessel revascularizations compared with those with the bare-metal stents (4.5 versus 7.5 percent and 5.8 versus 8.7 percent, respectively).

In the other study, Stefan K. James, M.D., of Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden, and colleagues evaluated data from the national registry on 10,294 patients who had received drug-eluting stents and 18,659 patients who received bare-metal stents between 2003 and 2006. The authors note that there was no difference in death, myocardial infarction or the combined outcome, but restenosis was lower with the drug-eluting stent versus the bare-metal stent (3.0 versus 4.7 events per 100 patient-years).

"As compared with bare-metal stents, drug-eluting stents are associated with a similar long-term incidence of death or myocardial infarction and provide a clinically important decrease in the rate of restenosis among high-risk patients," James and colleagues conclude.

Researchers in both studies report receiving consulting fees from stent manufacturer, Boston Scientific.

Abstract - Stone
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Abstract - James
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