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Better Treatment of Brain Hemorrhage Needed

Last Updated: May 08, 2009.

Given that death rates for patients with non-traumatic cerebral hemorrhage have not improved in the last decade, better clinical management is needed to reduce death and increase functional survival, according to a study in the May 9 issue of The Lancet.

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Given that death rates for patients with non-traumatic cerebral hemorrhage have not improved in the last decade, better clinical management is needed to reduce death and increase functional survival, according to a study in the May 9 issue of The Lancet.

Adnan I. Qureshi, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues studied the diagnosis, clinical features, management, and outcomes of non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage based on a literature review and their personal knowledge.

Noting that hospital admissions for intracerebral hemorrhage have increased by 18 percent over the last decade with no drop in mortality, the investigators write that coordinated primary and specialty care has been associated with reduced mortality. Stopping the bleeding, removing the clot, and controlling cerebral perfusion pressure are most important in treating intracerebral hemorrhage, and treatment can include hemostasis and open and minimally invasive surgery. Early diagnosis and management of blood and intracranial pressures are also important, they note.

"These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival," Qureshi and colleagues conclude.

Authors of this study have reported financial relationships with the pharmaceutical industry.

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