Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Internal Medicine | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Simple Survey Assesses Adherence to Gluten-Free Diet

Last Updated: May 12, 2009.

A simple seven-question tool may be effective in assessing gluten-free diet adherence among individuals with celiac disease, according to research published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- A simple seven-question tool may be effective in assessing gluten-free diet adherence among individuals with celiac disease, according to research published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Daniel A. Leffler, M.D., of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues discuss their efforts to develop the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test (CDAT). The researchers developed 85 questions related to gluten-free diet adherence. After 150 individuals took this survey and underwent a standardized dietitian evaluation for gluten exposure, the survey was reduced to 41 questions and given to another 50 individuals.

Further analysis yielded the seven-item CDAT. The additive score, ranging from seven to 35, was highly correlated with the standardized dietitian evaluation score and with IgA tissue transglutaminase (tTG) titers. The instrument is easily administered and is superior to tTG serology, the authors write.

"In conclusion, the CDAT is a novel tool specifically developed to assess gluten-free diet adherence that meets essential criteria for reliability and face, internal, and external validity. The CDAT requires little time to complete and is simple to administer, score, and interpret. This subjective, patient-completed tool can be used alone or in conjunction with biological markers to assess dietary adherence and disease activity in individuals with celiac disease. Standardized instruments such as the CDAT will be essential in future clinical research studies of celiac disease," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Antioxidants Block Beneficial Effects of Exercise Next: Information Technology Helps With Blood Pressure Control

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: