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Information Technology Helps With Blood Pressure Control

Last Updated: May 12, 2009.

An information technology-supported program helps hypertensive patients achieve blood pressure targets, according to a study published online May 5 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- An information technology-supported program helps hypertensive patients achieve blood pressure targets, according to a study published online May 5 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Stephane Rinfret, M.D., of the University of Montreal in Canada, and colleagues conducted a study of 223 primary care patients with hypertension who had a mean 24-hour blood pressure of greater than 130/80 and a daytime blood pressure of greater than 135/85 mm Hg. The subjects were randomized to a control group under usual care, or to a group receiving a blood pressure monitor, information technology-supported adherence information and a blood pressure monitoring system which provided monthly reports from physicians, nurses and pharmacists.

The intervention group had a consistently greater change in the mean 24-hour ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared to the control group, and whereas 46 percent of patients in the intervention group achieved Canadian Guideline target blood pressure, only 28.6 percent of the control group patients did so, the researchers found. The intervention group patients were more likely than the control subjects to adhere to prescription refills, and their physicians were more likely to alter the dose of antihypertensive drugs prescribed, the investigators noted.

"Our IT-supported multidisciplinary management program significantly improved blood pressure levels and control in primary care," the authors conclude. "Our results clearly support the need for further investigation on innovative approaches that can improve the management of hypertension and other chronic diseases."

The study was partially funded by Pfizer Canada Inc., and four of the authors reported receiving an honorarium from the company.

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