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History of Stroke Raises Mild Cognitive Impairment Risk

Last Updated: May 13, 2009.

Nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment is more common among those with a history of stroke than those without, while the APOE ε4 genotype is associated with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and memory loss, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Neurology.

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment is more common among those with a history of stroke than those without, while the APOE ε4 genotype is associated with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and memory loss, according to a study in the May Archives of Neurology.

David S. Knopman, M.D., and colleagues at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn., conducted a study of 2,050 70- to 89-year-old residents of Olmstead County, Minn., who underwent neurological evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and an interview to determine those with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment, or dementia.

Among the subjects, the authors note that 1,640 were cognitively normal, 329 had mild cognitive impairment, of whom 241 had amnesia and 88 did not. Among the subjects without dementia, those with a history of stroke were 2.85 times more likely to have nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment and 1.77 times more likely to have amnestic mild cognitive impairment, while those with the APOE ε4 genotype were more likely to have amnestic mild cognitive impairment and impaired memory function, the investigators discovered.

"While studies have shown that a history of stroke was associated with cognitive impairment, our findings may offer the clearest view of the domain specificity of the association," the authors write. "The differential associations of a history of stroke and non-memory cognition and APOE ε4 genotype and memory suggest that the pathophysiological processes driven by cerebrovascular disease and APOE genotype are distinct."

Several authors reported relationships with the pharmaceutical industry.

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