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Gastric Bypass Surgery Linked to Kidney Stones

Last Updated: May 28, 2009.

Obese patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery may have a significantly increased risk of kidney stone disease and the need to undergo kidney stone surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery may have a significantly increased risk of kidney stone disease and the need to undergo kidney stone surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

Brian R. Matlaga, M.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, and colleagues analyzed five-year data on 4,639 patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and 4,639 obese patients who did not undergo gastric bypass surgery.

The researchers found that kidney stone disease occurred in significantly more surgical patients than controls (7.65 versus 4.63 percent) and that more surgical patients had shock wave lithotripsy and ureteroscopy than controls (81 versus 19 and 98 versus 27). Their analysis showed that gastric bypass surgery was significantly associated with both kidney stone disease and the need for kidney stone surgery (odds ratios, 1.71 and 3.65, respectively).

"As obesity is currently an important national health issue and bariatric surgery to treat it is increasing at a rapid rate, further studies are urgently required to better define the etiology of hyperoxaluria as well as other stone risk factors in this population," the authors conclude. "Thus, future efforts can be devoted to altering risk factors for this disorder, thereby attenuating kidney stone formation following bariatric surgery."

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