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December 2016 Briefing - Dermatology

Last Updated: January 01, 2017.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Dermatology for December 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Fatigue Levels Vary for Patients With Psoriatic Disease

FRIDAY, Dec. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psoriatic arthritis have higher levels of fatigue than patients with psoriasis treated with phototherapy or systemic treatment, according to a research letter published online Dec. 22 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Incidence of Melanoma Continues to Rise in Majority of States

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is regional variation in the incidence and death rates for melanoma; and sex, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity impact the prevalence of indoor tanning use, according to two research letters published online Dec. 28 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Ustekinumab Tolerated in Severe Atopic Dermatitis

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Ustekinumab is tolerated for treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) in certain patients, according to a research letter published online Dec. 22 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Gastric Bypass Associated With Reduced Risk of Psoriasis

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Gastric bypass, but not gastric banding, is associated with reduced risk of psoriasis, progression to severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in JAMA Surgery.

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Personal Health Care Spending Continues to Soar in the U.S.

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 1996 to 2013 there were considerable increases in personal health care spending in the United States, with the highest amounts for diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and low back and neck pain, according to a study published in the Dec. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Oxidative Stress Tied to Early-Onset Androgenetic Alopecia

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Younger patients with early-onset androgenetic alopecia (AGA) have increased oxidative stress, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

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Confocal Microscopy Aids Surgical Removal of Tumors From Eyelid

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Imaging using fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) analysis in the reflectance mode and with an "en face" scanning can control tumor margins of eyelid basal cell carcinoma (BCC) to optimize surgical management, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

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Melanoma Incidence, Mortality Continue to Rise in the U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The burden of melanoma is increasing in the United States, according to a research letter published online Dec. 21 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Pritelivir Beats Valacyclovir for Genital HSV-2 Shedding

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The novel herpes simplex virus (HSV) helicase-primase inhibitor pritelivir is more effective than valacyclovir for reducing genital HSV-2 shedding, according to a study published in the Dec. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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MicroRNAs 203 and 205 Are Prognostic in Cutaneous SCC

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- MicroRNAs (miR-203 and miR-205) could be useful prognostic markers in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, with distinct expression and associations, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Pathologists Vary in Suggested Therapy for Melanocytic Lesions

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pathologists have wide variability in treatment suggestions for melanocytic lesions, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Health Care Provider Burnout Negatively Affects Quality, Safety

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Health care provider burnout is negatively associated with quality and safety of health care, according to a meta-analysis published recently in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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DEA Announces Critical Changes in Registration Renewal Process

MONDAY, Dec. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has announced critical changes in its registration renewal process, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians.

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Imiquimod Has Sustained Benefit for Basal Cell Carcinoma

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For superficial or nodular basal cell carcinoma at low-risk sites, imiquimod has lower treatment success rates than surgery but the benefit is sustained at five years, according to a study published online Dec. 5 in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

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Home-Use Device Safe, Effective for Periorbital Wrinkles

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A home-use device combining radiofrequency and light-emitting diode energies is safe and efficacious for self-treatment of periorbital wrinkles, according to a study published online Dec. 2 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

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Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Stress May Raise Psoriasis Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement is associated with psoriasis only for children born to a mother who lost a partner/spouse or an older child, according to a study published online Dec. 7 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Prevalence of Disability 2.7 Percent at U.S. Medical Schools

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of disability is 2.7 percent among medical students at U.S. allopathic medical schools, according to a research letter published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue of medical education.

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Learning Interventions Can Improve Med Student Well-Being

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Specific learning interventions may improve emotional well-being among medical students, according to a review published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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Depression, Suicide Ideation Prevalent in Medical Students

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalences of depression or depressive symptoms and suicide ideation are 27.2 and 11.1 percent, respectively, among medical students, according to a review published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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Alcohol Intake Linked to Increase in Risk of Melanoma

FRIDAY, Dec. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol intake is associated with increased risk of melanoma, especially in relatively ultraviolet (UV)-spared areas, according to a study published in the December issue of Cancer, Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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CDC: Fewer U.S. Families Struggling to Pay Medical Bills

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of people in families having problems paying medical bills fell by nearly 13 million from 2011 through the first six months of 2016, according to a report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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