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Evidence Weak on Link Between IUGR, Thrombophilias

Last Updated: June 01, 2009.

Existing evidence does not seem to support a strong association between inherited thrombophilias and intrauterine growth restriction, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

MONDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Existing evidence does not appear to support a strong association between inherited thrombophilias and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Francesca Facco, M.D., of Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago, and colleagues sought to assess the strength of any relationship between inherited thrombophilias and IUGR by including 14 case-control studies and five cohort studies in a meta-analysis. These focused on factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation.

The researchers found that the association between prothrombin and IUGR in case-control studies was insignificant. The overall summary odds ratio of 1.23 for the association between factor V Leiden and IUGR was significant, but was mostly driven by findings from case-control studies. The overall summary odds ratio for the association between MTHFR and IUGR wasn't significant, however, in just the case-control studies the association was significant (odds ratio, 1.35). The authors note that the evidence of publication bias for the factor V Leiden and MTHFR mutations further reduced their significance.

"Determining whether an association exists between thrombophilias and IUGR is important for several reasons. If such an association exists, it would further help us to understand the physiologic events that lead to this pathology. Moreover, understanding this pathophysiology is an important step in determining therapeutic interventions," the authors conclude.

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