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Category: Emergency Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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January 2017 Briefing - Emergency Medicine

Last Updated: February 01, 2017.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Emergency Medicine for January 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

MRI May Help ID Suicide Risk in Young Bipolar Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Among adolescents and young adults with bipolar disorder, those who attempt suicide show reduced volume and activity in areas of the brain that regulate emotion and impulses, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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CVD-Related Hospital Admissions Up Second Day After Snowstorm

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There is a sharp increase in hospital admissions for cardiovascular events two days after a major snowfall, according to research published online Jan. 30 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Therapeutic Family Presence Key in Tx of Acute Deterioration in ER

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For deteriorating adult patients in the emergency department, no family presence and physical family presence result in predominantly negative clinician-family-patient interactions, while therapeutic family presence results in positive clinician-family-patient interactions, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Inconsistency Noted in Ocular Symptom Reporting

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patient self-report of symptoms on an Eye Symptom Questionnaire (ESQ) is frequently inconsistent with documentation in the electronic medical record (EMR), according to a study published online Jan. 26 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Dietary Factors Linked to Risk of Acute Pancreatitis

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary factors are associated with pancreatitis, with saturated fat and cholesterol positively linked to gallstone-related acute pancreatitis (AP), according to a study published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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NATA Issues Clinical Guidance on Acute Skin Trauma in Sports

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical decisions and intervention protocols after acute skin trauma during participation in athletic and recreational activities vary among athletic trainers and are often based on ritualistic practices, according to a National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement published in the December issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

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Unusual Amnestic Syndrome Seen With Opioid Abuse

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term memory loss may be yet another price of America's opioid addiction epidemic, according to a report published in the Jan. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Most PCPs Oppose Complete Repeal of the Affordable Care Act

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of primary care doctors oppose full repeal of the Affordable Care Act, according to a perspective piece published online Jan. 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Safety Profile of Red Yeast Rice Found Similar to Statins

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The cholesterol-lowering supplement red yeast rice could pose the same health risks to users as statin drugs, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Catheter Safeguards at Hospitals Cut Bloodstream Infection Rates

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Improved catheter safety measures in hospitals significantly reduce bloodstream infections and health care costs, according to a review published recently in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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ACA Has Increased Coverage, Access for Chronically Ill Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans with a chronic illness gained health insurance coverage after the Affordable Care Act went into effect in 2010, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Obesity Underrepresented in Medical Licensing Exams

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The most important concepts of obesity prevention and treatment are not adequately represented on the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step examinations, according to a study published recently in Teaching and Learning in Medicine.

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Sepsis Guidelines Improve Patient Care in ER

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of sepsis guidelines improves early assessment, recognition, and management of patients presenting to an emergency department with sepsis, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Quick SOFA Score Predicts In-Hospital Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected infection presenting to the emergency department, the quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score is better than systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or severe sepsis criteria for identifying patients at high risk of mortality, according to a study published in the Jan. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Current Asthma Ruled Out for One-in-Three Diagnosed Adults

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- About one-third of adults with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma within the past five years have no evidence of asthma, according to a study published in the Jan. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician Excess Charges Create Financial Burden for Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many doctors bill their private-paying patients two, three, even six times more than what Medicare pays for the same services, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria More Problematic Than Thought

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is more widespread in U.S. hospitals than previously thought and needs to be more closely monitored, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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BNP, Gal-3 Levels Predict 60-Day Readmission in Heart Failure

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), measurement of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and galectin-3 (Gal-3) before discharge can predict hospital readmission within 60 days, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Pace of Influenza Activity Picking Up Across the United States

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The pace of flu activity continues to quicken across the United States, and probably hasn't peaked yet, according to an assessment by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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CDC: Higher Risk of Death From Leading Causes in Rural America

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Americans who live in rural areas have a higher risk of death from five leading causes than people who live in urban locations, according to research published in the Jan. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Gut Metabolite May Help Predict Cardiovascular Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A metabolite produced in the digestion of red meat, eggs, and dairy products -- trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) -- is linked to an increased risk of a fatal myocardial infarction or stroke, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the European Heart Journal.

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Excessive FDA Regulation Driving High Drug Prices

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The excessive regulatory regime at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is an important driver of high drug prices, and should be curbed to introduce more competition and lower prices, according to a report published online Jan. 5 by the National Center for Policy Analysis.

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Care Can Be Compromised When Parents Offend Pediatric Staff

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Rude parents can rattle medical staff enough to compromise the quality of care their critically ill child receives, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Process-of-Care Failures Common in Adults With Rectal Bleeding

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Among adult primary care patients with rectal bleeding, process-of-care failures are frequent and are associated with poor or fair quality care, according to a study published in the January issue of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.

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Valerian Root Supplement Use Linked to Severe Hyponatremia

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A case of acute severe hyponatremia secondary to polydipsia in association with increased use of herbal remedies has been presented in BMJ Case Reports.

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Higher Odds of Trial of Labor With Night Float Call System

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians working on a night float call system are more likely to have patients with a prior cesarean delivery undergo trial of labor and achieve vaginal birth, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Long-Term Disability Risk Up for Seniors Who Visit ER

FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors treated in an emergency department for illness or injury are more likely to become disabled and less physically agile over the next six months, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Anterior T-Wave Inversion in 2.3 Percent of Healthy Young Adults

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Anterior T-wave inversion (ATWI) occurs in 2.3 percent of young asymptomatic adults, usually in leads V1 and V2, according to a study published in the Jan. 3/10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Editorial

Gunshot Violence Transmitted Through Social Networks

TUESDAY, Jan. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Social contagion accounts for a considerable proportion of gunshot violence episodes, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Greater Drop in Readmissions With ACA Program Penalties

TUESDAY, Jan. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is a greater reduction in readmission rates at hospitals subject to penalties under the Affordable Care Act's Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP), according to a study published online Dec. 27 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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