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Category: Anesthesiology & Pain | Monthly Briefing

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January 2017 Briefing - Anesthesiology

Last Updated: February 01, 2017.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Anesthesiology for January 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Review: Cardiopulmonary Event Rate Not Up With Propofol Use

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of cardiopulmonary adverse events is similar for propofol sedation and traditional sedation agents for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures, according to a review published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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ACOG: Interventions Can Be Limited During Labor, Birth

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women can meet their labor and birth goals with minimal intervention, according to an American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee Opinion published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Most PCPs Oppose Complete Repeal of the Affordable Care Act

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of primary care doctors oppose full repeal of the Affordable Care Act, according to a perspective piece published online Jan. 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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'Opt Out' Doesn't Increase Access to Anesthesia Care

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The "opt out" rule, which allows U.S. states to opt out of the regulations requiring physician supervision of nurse anesthetists has not increased access to anesthesia care for certain common procedures, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in Anesthesiology.

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Gene May ID Patients Needing Higher Doses of Methadone

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic variant associated with opioid addiction may lead to personalized treatment for the condition, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Molecular Psychiatry.

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Catheter Safeguards at Hospitals Cut Bloodstream Infection Rates

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Improved catheter safety measures in hospitals significantly reduce bloodstream infections and health care costs, according to a review published recently in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Obesity Underrepresented in Medical Licensing Exams

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The most important concepts of obesity prevention and treatment are not adequately represented on the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step examinations, according to a study published recently in Teaching and Learning in Medicine.

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Physician Excess Charges Create Financial Burden for Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many doctors bill their private-paying patients two, three, even six times more than what Medicare pays for the same services, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Patient Perception of Provider Concern Impacts Satisfaction

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic pain receiving opioids, provider satisfaction is not associated with functional outcomes; however, patient perception of provider concern impacts perceived satisfaction, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Pain Practice.

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Risk of Post-Op Infections Up in Overweight, Obese Children

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese children seem to be more likely than others to develop postoperative surgical site infections, according to a study published recently in Surgical Infections.

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TENS Relieves Pain During Office Hysterectomy Without Sedation

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) can reduce pain during office hysterectomy without sedation, according to a study published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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