Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Orthopedics | Pharmacy | Surgery | Conference News

Back to Journal Articles

AAOS: Few Hip Fracture Patients Take Vitamin D Consistently

Last Updated: March 14, 2017.

More than half of femoral neck patients undergoing surgical fixation with cancellous screw or sliding hip screws do not take vitamin D consistently, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego.

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of femoral neck patients undergoing surgical fixation with cancellous screw or sliding hip screws do not take vitamin D consistently, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego.

Sheila Sprague, Ph.D., from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and colleagues conducted a multicenter randomized trial involving 1,111 femoral neck fracture patients treated with cancellous screw or sliding hip screws. At each of the follow-up visits over a two-year period a subset of patients was asked about vitamin D supplementation. Patients were categorized based on their frequency of vitamin D supplementation in the first six months of follow-up. Data were included for 573 patients.

The researchers found that 18.7, 35.6, and 45.7 percent of patients reported never taking vitamin D, taking vitamin D inconsistently, and taking vitamin D consistently, respectively. There was a correlation for consistent post-fracture vitamin D supplementation with an increase in the physical component of the 12-month Short Form-12 score (2.42 increase; P = 0.033). There was no correlation for vitamin D supplementation with re-operation rates (P = 0.386).

"Despite well-developed vitamin D supplementation guidelines, we found that a surprisingly low proportion of elderly hip fracture patients are consistently taking vitamin D, which suggests a potential need for additional strategies to promote compliance with vitamin D supplementation in this population," the authors write.

Abstract
More Information


Previous: Visceral Fat Differentiates Crohn's From Intestinal Tuberculosis Next: Risk of Heart Failure Up for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: