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HPV Vaccine Linked to High Efficacy in Neoplasia Reduction

Last Updated: July 08, 2009.

The human papillomavirus-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine shows high efficacy in the prevention of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2+ associated with HPV-16/18, and may also provide cross-protection of non-vaccine oncogenic HPV types, according to the final analysis of the PATRICIA study published online July 7 in The Lancet.

WEDNESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- The human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine shows high efficacy in the prevention of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2+ (CIN2+) associated with HPV-16/18, and may also provide cross-protection of non-vaccine oncogenic HPV types, according to the final analysis of the PATRICIA study published online July 7 in The Lancet.

Jorma Paavonen, M.D., of the University of Helsinki in Finland, and colleagues assessed about 9,000 women ages 15 to 25 years who received complete vaccination with the HPV vaccine for CIN2+ and for cross-protection against persistent infection with the non-vaccine oncogenic HPV types.

After a mean follow-up of 34.9 months, the researchers found that the vaccine was associated with a 93 percent reduction in CIN2+ associated with HPV-16/18 in a primary analysis, and up to a 54 percent reduction in CIN2+ associated with 12 non-vaccine oncogenic HPV types. The researchers also found that the vaccine was associated with significant overall effect in cohorts that are relevant to universal mass vaccination and catch-up programs.

"Currently, the targets for HPV vaccination are girls and young women aged 11 to 26 years prior to sexual debut," state the authors of an accompanying Comment. "While good utilization of the program will reduce cervical cancer incidence in a couple of decades, this subgroup of the population at risk is too small to limit the spread of the virus. The only efficient way to stop the virus is to also vaccinate the other half of the sexually active population: boys and men."

The study was supported by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; several authors reported financial relationships with GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals.

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