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American Academy of Pediatrics, Sept. 16-19

Last Updated: September 20, 2017.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition

The annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics was held from Sept. 16 to 19 in Chicago and attracted approximately 12,000 participants from around the world, including primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists, pediatric surgical specialists, and other health care professionals. The conference featured scientific sessions that focused on the latest advances in the care of infants, children, adolescents and young adults, as well as scientific papers, posters, and education exhibits.

In one study, Shane M. Miller, M.D., of the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children in Dallas, and colleagues found that girl soccer players were five times more likely than boys to continue playing on the same day after sustaining a concussion, despite medical guidelines recommending immediate removal from play and not returning to play on the same day.

"This alarming difference suggests there may be opportunities to improve efforts to increase injury reporting and removal from play, particularly among girl soccer players. Also concerning was the finding that 40 percent of the athletes returned to play after their injury, regardless of gender," Miller said. "With this information, clinicians are better equipped to educate patients, as well as parents, about the importance of recognizing a possible concussion and removing a young athlete from play."

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In another study, Calista Harbaugh, M.D., of the University of Michigan Medical School and C.S. Mott Children's Hospital in Ann Arbor, and colleagues found that a percentage of teens and young adults filled their opioid prescriptions for several months after surgery and after typical recovery time periods.

"Among a cohort of 88,637 patients ages 13 to 21 years undergoing surgery who were not taking opioid pain medications before surgery, we found that 5 percent of adolescents and young adults are filling opioid prescriptions three to six months after the procedure. The adolescents and young adults at highest risk had a history of substance use disorder or chronic pain conditions," Harbaugh said. "This presents an opportunity for us to identify patients at the highest risk before surgery so that we can educate patients and parents on safe opioid use, prescribe appropriately, and monitor following surgery. It is important for providers from all specialties to be aware of this possible complication so that communication and transitions of care are enhanced when prescription opioids are provided at the time of surgery."

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Keith Martin, D.O., of Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., and colleagues compared frequencies of parent and child adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) between U.S.-born and immigrant parents, adjusting for parent gender, insurance, income, education, child race, and child age.

"Compared to immigrant parents, we found that U.S.-born parents reported experiencing significantly more ACEs, most commonly loss of a parent (40 percent), poverty (32 percent), and bullying (32 percent)," Martin said. "Among immigrant parents, the most common ACEs were poverty (30 percent), unsafe neighborhood (20 percent), and emotional neglect (18 percent)."

The investigators found that U.S.-born parents also reported more ACEs for their children.

"Among children of U.S.-born and immigrant parents, the most common ACEs were parent loss (31 and 22 percent, respectively) poverty (37 and 17 percent), and bullying (39 and 12 percent)," Martin said. "Differences revealed in the study may result from different interpretations of ACE-related questions based on culture or language, or a difference in willingness to divulge this information. Another possibility is that they reflect what researchers call the 'immigrant paradox,' a phenomenon identified in earlier studies that suggests immigrants generally report higher levels of health, achievement, and well-being than U.S.-born patients, despite greater disadvantage such as poverty, low educational level, poor access to health care, legal status, language barriers, and discrimination."

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In an effort to help physicians and schools better value time spent in nature, Stephen Pont, M.D., M.P.H., of the Dell Children's Medical Center and the University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, and colleagues produced infographics summarizing research documenting the benefits of nature (e.g., time in nature increases physical activity and improves academic outcomes and mental health).

"We hope our research-summarizing infographics will lead to more physicians recommending that their patients spend time in nature and also that they will advocate for children to spend more time in nature such as during school time," Pont said. "Greening schoolyards is an important and feasible way that children can spend time in nature daily, and is also a way for communities to have access to nature after the school day."

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AAP: Epinephrine Admin Training Needed in Many Schools

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In the school setting, epinephrine injection training for individuals other than nurses may be beneficial, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Sept. 16 to 19 in Chicago.

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AAP: Few Doctors Provide Firearm Injury Prevention Info in ER

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians do not provide firearm injury prevention information in the emergency department, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Sept. 16 to 19 in Chicago.

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AAP: Some Improvement in Child Passenger Safety Practices

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There has been some improvement in child passenger safety practices among Indiana drivers, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Sept. 16 to 19 in Chicago.

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AAP: Sliding on Lap Linked to Leg Fracture for Young Children

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young children injured going down a slide on someone's lap most commonly experience leg fractures, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Sept. 16 to 19 in Chicago.

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AAP: Cellphone Ownership Linked to Cyberbullying in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cellphone ownership is related to cyberbullying, and the relationship is stronger among younger subjects in third and fourth grade, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Sept. 16 to 19 in Chicago.

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AAP: Incidence of Golf Cart Accidents 0.36/100,000 Patients

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The estimated mean annual incidence of golf cart accidents in children is 0.36 cases/100,000 patients, according to a study scheduled to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Sept. 16 to 19 in Chicago.

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AAP: Opioid Dependence/Abuse Public Health Issue for Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid dependence/abuse is a critical public health issue among children in the United States, according to a study scheduled to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Sept. 16 to 19 in Chicago.

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