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Night Shift Tied to Increased Odds of Abdominal Obesity

Last Updated: October 05, 2017.

Night shift workers have increased odds of obesity/overweight, especially abdominal obesity, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 4 in Obesity Reviews.

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Night shift workers have increased odds of obesity/overweight, especially abdominal obesity, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 4 in Obesity Reviews.

M. Sun, from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of observational studies that examined the correlations between work patterns and obesity. Data from 28 studies were included in the meta-analysis.

The researchers found that the odds ratio for the risk of obesity/overweight associated with night shift work was 1.23. A higher risk of 1.26 was seen in cross-sectional studies compared with cohort studies (risk ratio, 1.1). The frequency of developing abdominal obesity was increased for shift workers compared with other obesity types (odds ratio, 1.35). Compared with rotating night workers, permanent night workers had a 29 percent increased risk (odds ratio, 1.43 versus 1.14).

"This meta-analysis confirmed the risks of night shift work for the development of overweight and obesity with a potential gradient association suggested, especially for abdominal obesity," the authors write.

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