Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Cardiology | Endocrinology | Internal Medicine | Nephrology | Ophthalmology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Type 1 Diabetes Complications Becoming Less Common

Last Updated: July 29, 2009.

Intensive therapy to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus reduces the frequency of serious complications over the long term, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

WEDNESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive therapy to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus reduces the frequency of serious complications over the long term, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

David M. Nathan, M.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues analyzed data on 1,441 patients participating in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, which ran from 1983 to 1993 and assigned patients to either conventional or intensive treatment; and 161 patients from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications study.

Patients treated intensively had lower incidences of proliferative retinopathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease than those treated conventionally, and less than 1 percent of them became blind, underwent amputation, or needed kidney replacement because of diabetes, the researchers discovered.

"With the demonstration by the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial in 1993 of the beneficial effects of intensive therapy, largely attributable to the lowering of the level of chronic glycemia, intensive therapy has been universally recommended," the authors write. "The future of type 1 diabetes mellitus care will need to address improved implementation of intensive care to reduce patient burden and the risk of hypoglycemia; however, until prevention or cures are developed, intensive therapy must be implemented universally and as early as is practical and safe to ensure the health of persons with type 1 diabetes mellitus."

Several pharmaceutical companies contributed supplies for the study.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Screening Under-25s May Not Cut Cervical Cancer Rates Next: Mathematical Modeling Can Predict Herceptin Response

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: