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2004 to 2014 Saw Increases in Risk Factors in Ischemic Stroke

Last Updated: October 12, 2017.

From 2004 to 2014 there were increases in the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, and drug abuse in acute ischemic stroke, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in Neurology.

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- From 2004 to 2014 there were increases in the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, and drug abuse in acute ischemic stroke (AIS), according to a study published online Oct. 11 in Neurology.

Fadar Oliver Otite, M.D., from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida, and colleagues used the 2004-2014 National Inpatient Sample to assess the weighted prevalence of each risk factor in hospitalized patients with AIS.

The researchers found that 92.5 percent of patients with AIS had one or more risk factors. Hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, and drug abuse had age- and sex-adjusted prevalences of 79, 34, 47, 15, and 2 percent, respectively while the prevalences of carotid stenosis, chronic renal failure (CRF), and coronary artery disease (CAD) were 13, 12, and 27 percent. There was variation in the prevalence of risk factors by age, race, and sex. There was an annual increase of 1.4, 2, 7, 5, and 7 percent, respectively, in the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, and drug abuse. Annual increases of 13, 6, and 1 percent were seen in the prevalence of CRF, carotid stenosis, and CAD, respectively. Over time there was also an increase in the proportion of patients with multiple risk factors.

"Enhanced risk factor modification strategies and implementation of evidence-based recommendations are needed for optimal stroke prevention," the authors write.

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