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Colorectal Lesion Frequency Increases at Age 45

Last Updated: October 30, 2017.

A significant increase in colorectal lesion frequency is seen at 45 years of age, which suggests colorectal cancer screenings should begin earlier than currently recommended for adults at average risk, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of United European Gastroenterology, being held Oct. 28 to Nov. 1 in Barcelona, Spain.

MONDAY, Oct. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A significant increase in colorectal lesion frequency is seen at 45 years of age, which suggests colorectal cancer screenings should begin earlier than currently recommended for adults at average risk, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of United European Gastroenterology, being held Oct. 28 to Nov. 1 in Barcelona, Spain.

David Karsenti, M.D., of Clinique de Bercy in France, and colleagues analyzed prospectively collected data based on all 6,027colonoscopies performed in 2016 in patients referred to the 25 gastroenterologists at a single center. Median age of the patients was 57, and 55 percent were women.

The researchers found that the polyp detection rate (PDR), adenoma detection rate (ADR), and neoplasia detection rate (NDR) for the whole population were 34.1 percent, 32.1 percent, and 3.6 percent, respectively. Raw data showed a large increase in detection rates for mean number of polyps (MNP), ADR, large polyp detection rate (LPDR), and NDR beginning at age 45 years. Detection rates with MNP, ADR, and NDR were still significantly higher in patients from 45 to 49 years of age (0.39, 22.5 percent and 5.1 percent) versus patients <45 years (0.26, 13.6 percent, and 1.1 percent) when patients with familial and personal history of polyps or cancer were excluded.

"Regardless of the type of screening that is in place, the results of our research strongly indicate that screening for colorectal cancer should begin at the age of 45. This will this help us to increase the early detection of colorectal cancer in young adults and also enable the identification and safe removal of polyps that may become cancerous at a later date," Karsenti said in a statement.

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