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Bevacizumab Benefits Seen in Forms of Macular Edema

Last Updated: August 06, 2009.

Intravitreal injections of bevacizumab may be useful in treating diffuse diabetic macular edema and refractory cystoid macular edema, according to the results of two studies in the August Ophthalmology.

THURSDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Intravitreal injections of bevacizumab may be useful in treating diffuse diabetic macular edema and refractory cystoid macular edema, according to the results of two studies in the August Ophthalmology.

In the first study, J. Fernando Arevalo, M.D., of the Clinica Oftalmologica Centro Caracas in Venezuela, and colleagues analyzed data from 115 patients with diffuse diabetic macular edema. Patients were given an average of 5.8 injections of 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab per eye and were followed for up to 24 months. In the 1.25-mg group, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) improved from 20/150 to 20/75. In the 2.5-mg group, BCVA improved from 20/168 to 20/114.

In the other study, Arevalo and colleagues analyzed data from 31 patients who had refractory cystoid macular edema after cataract surgery. Patients received an average of 2.7 injections and were followed for 12 months. Mean BCVA changed from 20/200 at baseline to 20/80 at 12 months. Mean central macular thickness changed from 499.9 μm at baseline to 286.1 μm at 12 months.

"In summary, primary intravitreal bevacizumab at doses of 1.25 or 2.5 mg seem to provide stability and improvement in BCVA, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography results in diffuse diabetic macular edema at 24 months. No difference in outcomes between intravitreal bevacizumab at doses of 1.25 or 2.5 mg was identified. Therefore, doses lower than 2.5 mg should be preferred. Evaluation in a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial comparing intravitreal bevacizumab and focal or grid photocoagulation is needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this treatment method," conclude the authors of the first study.

Abstract - Study 1
Full Text - Study 1 (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Study 2
Full Text - Study 2 (subscription or payment may be required)


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