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Fremanezumab, Erenumab Effective in Treatment of Migraine

Last Updated: November 30, 2017.

Fremanezumab is effective for the prevention of chronic migraine, and erenumab is beneficial for treatment of episodic migraine, according to two studies published in the Nov. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

THURSDAY, Nov. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Fremanezumab is effective for the prevention of chronic migraine, and erenumab is beneficial for treatment of episodic migraine, according to two studies published in the Nov. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Stephen D. Silberstein, M.D., from Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, and colleagues randomized patients with chronic migraine in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive subcutaneous injections of fremanezumab quarterly (376 patients), fremanezumab monthly (379 patients), or matching placebo (375 patients). The researchers found that the least-squares mean reduction in the average number of headache days per month was 4.3 ± 0.3, 4.6 ± 0.3, and 2.5 ± 0.3 with fremanezumab quarterly, fremanezumab monthly, and placebo, respectively (P < 0.001 for both comparisons with placebo).

Peter J. Goadsby, M.D., Ph.D., from the King's College Hospital in London, and colleagues randomized patients with episodic migraine to receive a subcutaneous injection of erenumab (70 mg [317 patients] or 140 mg [319 patients]) or placebo (319 patients) monthly for six months. The researchers found that the mean number of migraine days per month was reduced by 3.2 and 3.7 in the 70 and 140 mg erenumab groups, respectively, compared with 1.8 in the placebo group (both P < 0.001) by months four through six.

"Erenumab administered subcutaneously at a monthly dose of 70 mg or 140 mg significantly reduced migraine frequency, the effects of migraines on daily activities, and the use of acute migraine-specific medication over a period of six months," Goadsby and colleagues write.

Several authors from the Silberstein study disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies, including Teva, which manufactures fremanezumab and funded the study. The Goadsby study was funded by Amgen (manufacturer of erenumab) and Novartis.

Abstract/Full Text - Silberstein (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract/Full Text - Goadsby (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)


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